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Recipe for 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 12 hr 15 min to make this recipe. The 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil recipe should make enough food for 4 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential bakeware items that might be necessary for this 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil recipe.

Ingredients for 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil

  • Four 7-ounce slices of filet mignon
  • 5 peppercorn mix (2 black/2 white/2 green/2 pink/1 Szechuan)
  • 1 cup canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 1 rosemary sprig
  • Celeriac Potato Cake, recipe follows
  • Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute, recipe follows
  • Basil Oil, recipe follows
  • 1 cup demi-glace (optional)
  • 3 cups grated potatoes (peeled then steamed, grated and chilled)
  • 3 cups raw celeriac, grated
  • 1/2 cup green scallions, sliced
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup clarified butter or ghee
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 6 cloves of garlic, thinly sliced
  • 4 cups baby spinach
  • 1/2 tablespoon Chinese vinegar
  • Salt and white pepper to taste
  • 2 cups basil leaves
  • 1 cup spinach
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup canola oil

Directions for 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil

  1. Coat the beef with the peppercorns and marinate in oil, garlic and rosemary for 4 hours or overnight, refrigerated. Season beef with salt and sear in a heavy pan. Turn beef over and place in 375-degree oven for 8 to 12 minutes depending on thickness of filet. Cook until medium rare. Place beef on top of a potato cake so that it will absorb the juices of the beef. Make 3 mounds of spinach around the beef and drizzle with Basil Oil and demi-glace.
  2. In a large bowl, mix together potato, celeriac and scallions. Season well. In a hot non-stick pan, liberally coat with clarified butter and cover with mix. Cake needs to get brown on this side. Drizzle a little of butter on the raw side then flip the cake over and place in a 375-degree oven to cook through. Cook about 12 minutes until hot in the middle. Slice pie shaped wedges for serving.
  3. In a wok, add canola oil and garlic and slowly heat. Eventually, the garlic will start frying. Carefully watch garlic and strain out once the garlic is light brown and crisp. Save the oil. Wipe out wok and bring to high heat. Add 1 tablespoon garlic oil and quickly stir in the spinach. Season and add back the crispy garlic and stir in the vinegar. Check for seasoning.
  4. In very salted water, blanch basil and spinach for 1 minute until very soft, yet still very green. Plunge in ice bath and squeeze out water. Blend at high speed and add salt and the oil. Cover blender and blend until the cup becomes warm.

Bakeware for your recipe

You will find below are bakeware items that could be needed for this 5 Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Celeriac-Potato Cake Fried Garlic and Baby Spinach Saute with Basil Oil recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Easy Main Dish
  • Main Dish
  • Roasted Potato
  • Roasted Vegetable
  • Potato – The potato is a starchy tuber of the plant Solanum tuberosum and is a root vegetable native to the Americas, with the plant itself being a perennial in the nightshade family Solanaceae.Wild potato species, originating in modern-day Peru, can be found throughout the Americas, from Canada to southern Chile. The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated by Native Americans independently in multiple locations, but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species traced a single origin for potatoes, in the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia. Potatoes were domesticated approximately 7,000–10,000 years ago there, from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex. In the Andes region of South America, where the species is indigenous, some close relatives of the potato are cultivated.Potatoes were introduced to Europe from the Americas in the second half of the 16th century by the Spanish. Today they are a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world’s food supply. As of 2014, potatoes were the world’s fourth-largest food crop after maize (corn), wheat, and rice. Following millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 5,000 different types of potatoes. Over 99% of presently cultivated potatoes worldwide descended from varieties that originated in the lowlands of south-central Chile. The importance of the potato as a food source and culinary ingredient varies by region and is still changing. It remains an essential crop in Europe, especially Northern and Eastern Europe, where per capita production is still the highest in the world, while the most rapid expansion in production over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia, with China and India leading the world in overall production as of 2018.Like the tomato, the potato is a nightshade in the genus Solanum, and the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine which is dangerous for human consumption. Normal potato tubers that have been grown and stored properly produce glycoalkaloids in amounts small enough to be negligible to human health, but if green sections of the plant (namely sprouts and skins) are exposed to light, the tuber can accumulate a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health.
  • Roasting – Roasting is a cooking method that uses dry heat where hot air covers the food, cooking it evenly on all sides with temperatures of at least 150 °C (300 °F) from an open flame, oven, or other heat source. Roasting can enhance the flavor through caramelization and Maillard browning on the surface of the food. Roasting uses indirect, diffused heat (as in an oven), and is suitable for slower cooking of meat in a larger, whole piece. Meats and most root and bulb vegetables can be roasted. Any piece of meat, especially red meat, that has been cooked in this fashion is called a roast. Meats and vegetables prepared in this way are described as “roasted”, e.g., roasted chicken or roasted squash.
  • Wok Recipes
  • Beef – Beef is the culinary name for meat from cattle.In prehistoric times, humans hunted aurochs and later domesticated them. Since then, numerous breeds of cattle have been bred specifically for the quality or quantity of their meat. Today, beef is the third most widely consumed meat in the world, after pork and poultry. As of 2018, the United States, Brazil, and China were the largest producers of beef.Beef can be prepared in various ways; cuts are often used for steak, which can be cooked to varying degrees of doneness, while trimmings are often ground or minced, as found in most hamburgers. Beef contains protein, iron, and vitamin B12. Along with other kinds of red meat, high consumption is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer and coronary heart disease, especially when processed. Beef has a high environmental impact, being a primary driver of deforestation with the highest greenhouse gas emissions of any agricultural product.
  • Spinach – Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a leafy green flowering plant native to central and western Asia. It is of the order Caryophyllales, family Amaranthaceae, subfamily Chenopodioideae. Its leaves are a common edible vegetable consumed either fresh, or after storage using preservation techniques by canning, freezing, or dehydration. It may be eaten cooked or raw, and the taste differs considerably; the high oxalate content may be reduced by steaming.It is an annual plant (rarely biennial), growing as tall as 30 cm (1 ft). Spinach may overwinter in temperate regions. The leaves are alternate, simple, ovate to triangular, and very variable in size: 2–30 cm (1–12 in) long and 1–15 cm (0.4–5.9 in) broad, with larger leaves at the base of the plant and small leaves higher on the flowering stem. The flowers are inconspicuous, yellow-green, 3–4 mm (0.1–0.2 in) in diameter, and mature into a small, hard, dry, lumpy fruit cluster 5–10 mm (0.2–0.4 in) across containing several seeds.In 2018, world production of spinach was 26.3 million tonnes, with China alone accounting for 90% of the total.
  • Beef Tenderloin – A beef tenderloin (US English), known as an eye fillet in Australasia, filet in France, Filet Mignon in Brazil, and fillet in the United Kingdom and South Africa, is cut from the loin of beef.

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

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