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Recipe for Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes. The Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes recipe should make enough food for 4 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes recipe.

Ingredients for Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes

  • 1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds) cut up
  • 3 cups buttermilk
  • Peanut oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour seasoned with salt and pepper
  • 4 large eggs, mixed with 2 tablespoons of water and seasoned with salt and pepper
  • 2 cups blue cornmeal, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • Ancho-Honey Sauce
  • 1 cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons ancho chile powder
  • 2 pounds red bliss potatoes, skin on and boiled
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 4 cloves roasted garlic, smashed to a paste
  • 1/2 cup cooked bacon, crumbled
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Directions for Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes

  1. For the Chicken: Place chicken in a large baking dish, add buttermilk, turn to coat. Cover and place in refrigerator for at least 4 hours. Heat 1-inch of the peanut oil in a cast iron skillet to 350 degrees F. Remove the chicken from the buttermilk, pat dry and season with salt and pepper. Dip each piece of chicken in the flour and pat off excess. Dip in the eggs then cornmeal. Slowly add the chicken pieces to the hot pan skin-side down in batches. Cover the skillet and reduce the heat to medium high and cook for 7 minutes, remove the cover, turn the chicken over and continue to cook for 6 to 7 minutes. Drain on paper towels and transfer to a platter. Drizzle with the Ancho Honey Sauce.
  2. For the Ancho Honey Sauce: Mix all ingredients together until blended.
  3. For the Buttermilk-Bacon Potatoes: Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl and smash, don’t puree.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Blue Corn Fried Chicken with Ancho Honey and Buttermilk-Bacon Smashed Potatoes recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • American – American(s) may refer to:
  • Southwestern – The points of the compass are an evenly spaced set of horizontal directions (or azimuths) used in navigation and geography. A compass rose is primarily composed of four cardinal directions—north, east, south, and west—each separated by 90 degrees, and secondarily divided by four ordinal (intercardinal) directions—northeast, southeast, southwest, and northwest—each located halfway between two cardinal directions. Some disciplines such as meteorology and navigation further divide the compass with additional azimuths. Within European tradition, a fully defined compass has 32 ‘points’ (and any finer subdivisions are described in fractions of points).Compass points are valuable in that they allow a user to refer to a specific azimuth in a colloquial fashion, without having to compute or remember degrees.
  • Red Potato Recipes
  • Cornmeal – Cornmeal is a meal (coarse flour) ground from dried corn. It is a common staple food, and is ground to coarse, medium, and fine consistencies, but not as fine as wheat flour can be. In Mexico, very finely ground cornmeal is referred to as corn flour. When fine cornmeal is made from maize that has been soaked in an alkaline solution, e.g., limewater (a process known as nixtamalization), it is called masa harina (or masa flour), which is used for making arepas, tamales and tortillas. Boiled cornmeal is called polenta in Italy and is also a traditional dish and bread substitute in Romania.
  • Grain Recipes
  • Chicken Recipes
  • Poultry – Poultry (/ˈpoʊltri/) are domesticated birds kept by humans for their eggs, their meat or their feathers. These birds are most typically members of the superorder Galloanserae (fowl), especially the order Galliformes (which includes chickens, quails, and turkeys). The term also includes birds that are killed for their meat, such as the young of pigeons (known as squabs) but does not include similar wild birds hunted for sport or food and known as game. The word “poultry” comes from the French/Norman word poule, itself derived from the Latin word pullus, which means small animal.The domestication of poultry took place around 5,400 years ago in Southeast Asia. This may have originally been as a result of people hatching and rearing young birds from eggs collected from the wild, but later involved keeping the birds permanently in captivity. Domesticated chickens may have been used for cockfighting at first and quail kept for their songs, but soon it was realised how useful it was having a captive-bred source of food. Selective breeding for fast growth, egg-laying ability, conformation, plumage and docility took place over the centuries, and modern breeds often look very different from their wild ancestors. Although some birds are still kept in small flocks in extensive systems, most birds available in the market today are reared in intensive commercial enterprises.Together with pig meat, poultry is one of the two most widely eaten types of meat globally, with over 70% of the meat supply in 2012 between them; poultry provides nutritionally beneficial food containing high-quality protein accompanied by a low proportion of fat. All poultry meat should be properly handled and sufficiently cooked in order to reduce the risk of food poisoning. Semi-vegetarians who consume poultry as the only source of meat are said to adhere to pollotarianism.The word “poultry” comes from the West & English “pultrie”, from Old French pouletrie, from pouletier, poultry dealer, from poulet, pullet. The word “pullet” itself comes from Middle English pulet, from Old French polet, both from Latin pullus, a young fowl, young animal or chicken. The word “fowl” is of Germanic origin (cf. Old English Fugol, German Vogel, Danish Fugl).
  • Bacon Recipes
  • Buttermilk – Buttermilk is a fermented dairy drink. Traditionally, it was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cultured cream. As most modern butter is not made with cultured cream but sweet cream, i.e. uncultured, most modern buttermilk is cultured. It is common in warm climates where unrefrigerated fresh milk sours quickly.Buttermilk can be drunk straight, and it can also be used in cooking. In making soda bread, the acid in buttermilk reacts with the raising agent, sodium bicarbonate, to produce carbon dioxide which acts as the leavening agent. Buttermilk is also used in marination, especially of chicken and pork.
  • Dairy Recipes
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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