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Recipe for 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup. This dish qualifies as a Intermediate level recipe. It should take you about 2 hr 23 min to make this recipe. The 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup recipe should make enough food for serves 6 to 8.

You can add your own personal twist to this 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential bakeware items that might be necessary for this 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup recipe.

Ingredients for 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup

  • Yeast dough, for crust homemade or store bought
  • 4 cups diced onions
  • 3 tablespoons butter or safflower oil
  • 2/3 cup diced slab bacon
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 cup sour cream or yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1 pound yellow peas
  • 1/2 pound salt pork or ham bone
  • 2 3/4 quarts water
  • 3 onions
  • 2 carrots, diced into small cubes
  • 2 to 3 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon savory
  • Salt and pepper

Directions for 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup

  1. Prepare yeast dough and let rise. Put onions and oil in heavy pot or skillet, cover, and cook over medium heat until soft and beginning to brown (about 15 minutes). Fry bacon, drain, and reserve.
  2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  3. Press down raised crust dough and roll out to 1/4-inch thick. Line an 8 1/2 by 14-inch pan with the dough. Roll the edges down and tuck under to form an even 2-inch rim. Let crust recover about 15 minutes. Then spread bacon and onions evenly over the bottom. Beat the eggs until lemon colored and combine with sour cream. Spread over onions. Scatter caraway seeds on top. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes.
  4. For the French Canadian Pea Soup: Soak peas overnight and drain. Put all ingredients into the pot. Bring to a boil for 2 minutes. Remove and let stand 1 hour. Put back onto the heat and bring to a boil. Lower heat, cover, and simmer 1 hour or more until peas are tender. Add salt and pepper. Reheat before serving. Usually tastes better second time around.

Bakeware for your recipe

You will find below are bakeware items that could be needed for this 18th Century recipes for Onion Pie and French Canadian Pea Soup recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Carrot Soup
  • Vegetable Soup – Vegetable soup is a common soup prepared using vegetables and leaf vegetables as primary ingredients. It dates to ancient history, and is a mass-produced food product in contemporary times.
  • Carrot Recipes
  • Soup – Soup is a primarily liquid food, generally served warm or hot (but may be cool or cold), that is made by combining ingredients of meat or vegetables with stock, milk, or water. Hot soups are additionally characterized by boiling solid ingredients in liquids in a pot until the flavors are extracted, forming a broth. Soups are similar to stews, and in some cases there may not be a clear distinction between the two; however, soups generally have more liquid (broth) than stews.In traditional French cuisine, soups are classified into two main groups: clear soups and thick soups. The established French classifications of clear soups are bouillon and consommé. Thick soups are classified depending upon the type of thickening agent used: purées are vegetable soups thickened with starch; bisques are made from puréed shellfish or vegetables thickened with cream; cream soups may be thickened with béchamel sauce; and veloutés are thickened with eggs, butter, and cream. Other ingredients commonly used to thicken soups and broths include rice, lentils, flour, and grains; many popular soups also include pumpkin, carrots, potatoes, pig’s trotters and bird’s nests.Other types of soup include fruit soups, dessert soups, pulse soups like split pea, cold soups and other styles.
  • Canadian – Canadians (French: Canadiens) are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical or cultural. For most Canadians, many (or all) of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being Canadian.Canada is a multilingual and multicultural society home to people of groups of many different ethnic, religious, and national origins, with the majority of the population made up of Old World immigrants and their descendants. Following the initial period of French and then the much larger British colonization, different waves (or peaks) of immigration and settlement of non-indigenous peoples took place over the course of nearly two centuries and continue today. Elements of Indigenous, French, British, and more recent immigrant customs, languages, and religions have combined to form the culture of Canada, and thus a Canadian identity. Canada has also been strongly influenced by its linguistic, geographic, and economic neighbour—the United States.Canadian independence from the United Kingdom grew gradually over the course of many years following the formation of the Canadian Confederation in 1867. World War I and World War II in particular, gave rise to a desire among Canadians to have their country recognized as a fully-fledged sovereign state with a distinct citizenship. Legislative independence was established with the passage of the Statute of Westminster 1931, the Canadian Citizenship Act of 1946 took effect on January 1, 1947, and full sovereignty was achieved with the patriation of the constitution in 1982. Canada’s nationality law closely mirrored that of the United Kingdom. Legislation since the mid-20th century represents Canadians’ commitment to multilateralism and socioeconomic development.
  • Pot Pie Recipes
  • Beans and Legumes
  • Pea Recipes
  • Onion Recipes
  • Bacon Recipes
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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