Search
Close this search box.

Recipe for Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney by Dawn’s Recipes

Table of Contents

Recipe for Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney. This dish qualifies as a Intermediate level recipe. It should take you about 1 hr 35 min to make this recipe. The Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney recipe should make enough food for 12 to 14 aloo pies.

You can add your own personal twist to this Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential bakeware items that might be necessary for this Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney recipe.

Ingredients for Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney

  • 2 large russet potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • Small handful fresh cilantro
  • 1 medium habanero chile
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons roasted ground cumin
  • Salt
  • 1 tablespoon shortening, plus more for greasing cookie sheet
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Oil, for frying
  • Mango chutney, for serving

Directions for Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney

  1. For the filling: Boil potatoes until tender. Drain.
  2. Blend garlic, cilantro and habanero in a food processor.
  3. Mash cooked potatoes and add cumin and salt to taste.
  4. For the dough: Grease a cookie sheet.
  5. Mix flour, baking powder, sugar and salt in a bowl, then add shortening and warm water until able to knead.
  6. Form into 2- to 3-inch balls and place on greased cookie sheet. Rest in the fridge for 20 minutes.
  7. Flatten the dough balls on a flour-dusted surface, then add a scoop of the potato mixture to each. Fold over and close the edges of each to form a half-circle shape.
  8. Bring oil to 350 degrees F in a Dutch oven over medium heat.
  9. Fry the dough balls, flipping once, until golden brown. Drain, then serve with mango chutney.

Bakeware for your recipe

You will find below are bakeware items that could be needed for this Aloo Pies with Mango Chutney recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Fruit – In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world’s agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Mango – A mango is an edible stone fruit produced by the tropical tree Mangifera indica which is believed to have originated from the region between northwestern Myanmar, Bangladesh, and northeastern India. M. indica has been cultivated in South and Southeast Asia since ancient times resulting in two distinct types of modern mango cultivars: the “Indian type” and the “Southeast Asian type”. Other species in the genus Mangifera also produce edible fruits that are also called “mangoes”, the majority of which are found in the Malesian ecoregion.Worldwide, there are several hundred cultivars of mango. Depending on the cultivar, mango fruit varies in size, shape, sweetness, skin color, and flesh color which may be pale yellow, gold, green, or orange. The mango is the national fruit of India, Pakistan and the Philippines, while the mango tree is the national tree of Bangladesh.
  • Potato – The potato is a starchy tuber of the plant Solanum tuberosum and is a root vegetable native to the Americas, with the plant itself being a perennial in the nightshade family Solanaceae.Wild potato species, originating in modern-day Peru, can be found throughout the Americas, from Canada to southern Chile. The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated by Native Americans independently in multiple locations, but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species traced a single origin for potatoes, in the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia. Potatoes were domesticated approximately 7,000–10,000 years ago there, from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex. In the Andes region of South America, where the species is indigenous, some close relatives of the potato are cultivated.Potatoes were introduced to Europe from the Americas in the second half of the 16th century by the Spanish. Today they are a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world’s food supply. As of 2014, potatoes were the world’s fourth-largest food crop after maize (corn), wheat, and rice. Following millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 5,000 different types of potatoes. Over 99% of presently cultivated potatoes worldwide descended from varieties that originated in the lowlands of south-central Chile. The importance of the potato as a food source and culinary ingredient varies by region and is still changing. It remains an essential crop in Europe, especially Northern and Eastern Europe, where per capita production is still the highest in the world, while the most rapid expansion in production over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia, with China and India leading the world in overall production as of 2018.Like the tomato, the potato is a nightshade in the genus Solanum, and the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine which is dangerous for human consumption. Normal potato tubers that have been grown and stored properly produce glycoalkaloids in amounts small enough to be negligible to human health, but if green sections of the plant (namely sprouts and skins) are exposed to light, the tuber can accumulate a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health.

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

Looking for some cooking inspiration?

Why not subscribe to our monthly recipe list? From seasonal recipes to new cooking trends that are worth trying, you will get it all and more right to your inbox. You can either follow the recipes exactly or use them as inspiration to create your own dishes. And the best part? It’s free!

recipe