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Recipe for Antipasto Pie by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Antipasto Pie by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Antipasto Pie. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 20 min to make this recipe. The Antipasto Pie recipe should make enough food for 8 wedges.

You can add your own personal twist to this Antipasto Pie recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential bakeware items that might be necessary for this Antipasto Pie recipe.

Ingredients for Antipasto Pie

  • 1 (12-inch) round or oval, crusty, chewy bread, such as Tuscan-style or a sesame semolina
  • 1 (14 to 16-ounce) jar giardiniera*, drained
  • 1/2 pound thinly sliced sharp provolone
  • 1 (14 to 16-ounce) jar roasted red peppers, or 2 fresh roasted red bell peppers, see note
  • 1 (14-ounce) can quartered artichoke hearts in water, drained
  • 1 (12-ounce) bag mixed salad greens, any variety
  • 1/2 cup (a couple of handfuls) fresh Italian flat leaf parsley leaves
  • 15 to 20 leaves fresh basil, torn
  • 1/3 pound sliced Genoa salami
  • 1/3 pound sliced sweet soppressata
  • 1/3 pound sliced cappacola (hot cured pork shoulder)
  • 1/4 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 vine-ripe tomato, thinly sliced
  • Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling
  • Coarse salt and pepper
  • 8 hot or sweet pickled cherry peppers

Directions for Antipasto Pie

  1. 8 (8,10 or 12-inch) bamboo party skewers
  2. Serving suggestions: green and black olives, herb flavored potato chips
  3. * Giardiniera is a Italian pickled salad of cauliflower, hot peppers and carrot found in International Foods aisle of market
  4. Cut the top off of a large round or oval bread and hollow it out leaving a half inch rim and bottom to your bread. The loaf should resemble a bowl or deep pie shell.
  5. Pulse the giardiniera in a food processor into a coarse relish. Spread and press relish into the bottom of your bread shell in an even layer. Top relish with a layer of provolone slices, red pepper pieces, and artichoke hearts. Press ingredients down as you work to make room in your shell for as much antipasto as possible.
  6. Combine mixed greens, parsley, and basil in a bowl. Add a thin layer of greens on top of artichokes, and drizzle with oil. Layer in meats and remaining cheese. Top with a few more greens, onion and tomato slices, and another drizzle of oil. Season the top of filled shell with salt and pepper. Bag up remaining unused greens and herbs for tomorrow night’s salad.
  7. Replace top of bread and wrap your GIANT, drip-less antipasto stuffed pie for travel.
  8. When you are ready to serve, spear hot or sweet cherry peppers on 10 or 12-inch bamboo skewers and space eight skewers equidistant around the bread. Cut bread into wedges, like a pie, and serve with olives and fancy potato chips.
  9. Note: to roast peppers, split each red bell pepper down the center and gut them by scooping out seeds with a tug using your cupped hand. Place peppers skin-side-up under broiler preheated to high. Leave oven door ajar for steam to escape and blacken peppers entirely. Place charred peppers into a paper bag and roll the bag up tightly. Let stand 5 minutes until peppers are cool enough to handle and peel off charred skins.

Bakeware for your recipe

You will find below are bakeware items that could be needed for this Antipasto Pie recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Food Processor – A food processor is a kitchen appliance used to facilitate repetitive tasks in the preparation of food. Today, the term almost always refers to an electric-motor-driven appliance, although there are some manual devices also referred to as “food processors”.Food processors are similar to blenders in many forms. A food processor typically requires little to no liquid during use, unlike a blender, which requires a set amount of liquid in order for the blade to properly blend the food. Food processors are used to blend, chop, dice, and slice, allowing for quicker meal preparation.
  • American – American(s) may refer to:
  • Sandwich – A sandwich is a food typically consisting of vegetables, sliced cheese or meat, placed on or between slices of bread, or more generally any dish wherein bread serves as a container or wrapper for another food type. The sandwich began as a portable, convenient finger food in the Western world, though over time it has become prevalent worldwide. In the 21st century there has been considerable debate over the precise definition of sandwich; and specifically whether a hot dog or open sandwich can be categorized as such. In the United States, the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration are the responsible agencies. The USDA uses the definition, “at least 35% cooked meat and no more than 50% bread” for closed sandwiches, and “at least 50% cooked meat” for open sandwiches.Sandwiches are a popular type of lunch food, taken to work, school, or picnics to be eaten as part of a packed lunch. The bread may be plain or be coated with condiments, such as mayonnaise or mustard, to enhance its flavour and texture. As well as being homemade, sandwiches are also widely sold in various retail outlets and can be served hot or cold. There are both savoury sandwiches, such as deli meat sandwiches, and sweet sandwiches, such as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.The sandwich is named after its supposed inventor, John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The Wall Street Journal has described it as Britain’s “biggest contribution to gastronomy”.
  • Carrot Recipes
  • Provolone Recipes
  • Tomato – Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) H. Karst.Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.The tomato is the edible berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum, commonly known as a tomato plant. The species originated in western South America and Central America. The Nahuatl word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word tomate, from which the English word tomato derived. Its domestication and use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of Mexico. The Aztecs used tomatoes in their cooking at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, and after the Spanish encountered the tomato for the first time after their contact with the Aztecs, they brought the plant to Europe. From there, the tomato was introduced to other parts of the European-colonized world during the 16th century.Tomatoes are a significant source of umami flavor.The tomato is consumed in diverse ways, raw or cooked, in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks. While tomatoes are fruits—botanically classified as berries—they are commonly used as a vegetable ingredient or side dish.Numerous varieties of the tomato plant are widely grown in temperate climates across the world, with greenhouses allowing for the production of tomatoes throughout all seasons of the year. Tomato plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height. They are vines that have a weak stem that sprawls and typically needs support. Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. (Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once.) The size of the tomato varies according to the cultivar, with a range of 1–10 cm (1⁄2–4 in) in width.
  • Cauliflower – Cauliflower is one of several vegetables in the species Brassica oleracea in the genus Brassica, which is in the Brassicaceae (or Mustard) family. It is an annual plant that reproduces by seed. Typically, only the head is eaten – the edible white flesh sometimes called “curd” (with a similar appearance to cheese curd). The cauliflower head is composed of a white inflorescence meristem. Cauliflower heads resemble those in broccoli, which differs in having flower buds as the edible portion. Brassica oleracea also includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, and kale, collectively called “cole” crops, though they are of different cultivar groups.
  • Potato – The potato is a starchy tuber of the plant Solanum tuberosum and is a root vegetable native to the Americas, with the plant itself being a perennial in the nightshade family Solanaceae.Wild potato species, originating in modern-day Peru, can be found throughout the Americas, from Canada to southern Chile. The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated by Native Americans independently in multiple locations, but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species traced a single origin for potatoes, in the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia. Potatoes were domesticated approximately 7,000–10,000 years ago there, from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex. In the Andes region of South America, where the species is indigenous, some close relatives of the potato are cultivated.Potatoes were introduced to Europe from the Americas in the second half of the 16th century by the Spanish. Today they are a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world’s food supply. As of 2014, potatoes were the world’s fourth-largest food crop after maize (corn), wheat, and rice. Following millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 5,000 different types of potatoes. Over 99% of presently cultivated potatoes worldwide descended from varieties that originated in the lowlands of south-central Chile. The importance of the potato as a food source and culinary ingredient varies by region and is still changing. It remains an essential crop in Europe, especially Northern and Eastern Europe, where per capita production is still the highest in the world, while the most rapid expansion in production over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia, with China and India leading the world in overall production as of 2018.Like the tomato, the potato is a nightshade in the genus Solanum, and the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine which is dangerous for human consumption. Normal potato tubers that have been grown and stored properly produce glycoalkaloids in amounts small enough to be negligible to human health, but if green sections of the plant (namely sprouts and skins) are exposed to light, the tuber can accumulate a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health.
  • Pork – Pork is the culinary name for the meat of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.Pork is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork.Pork is the most popular meat in the Western world and in Central Europe. It is also very popular in East and Southeast Asia (Mainland Southeast Asia, Philippines, Singapore, East Timor, and Malaysia). It is highly prized in Asian cuisines, especially in China, for its fat content and texture.Some religions and cultures prohibit pork consumption, notably Islam and Judaism.
  • Artichoke – The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus), also known by the names French artichoke and green artichoke in the U.S., is a variety of a species of thistle cultivated as a food.The edible portion of the plant consists of the flower buds before the flowers come into bloom. The budding artichoke flower-head is a cluster of many budding small flowers (an inflorescence), together with many bracts, on an edible base. Once the buds bloom, the structure changes to a coarse, barely edible form. Another variety of the same species is the cardoon, a perennial plant native to the Mediterranean region. Both wild forms and cultivated varieties (cultivars) exist.

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

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