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Recipe for Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 35 min to make this recipe. The Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes recipe should make enough food for 4 to 6 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential bakeware items that might be necessary for this Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes recipe.

Ingredients for Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 21/4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • 1/4 cup melted unsalted butter, plus some for frying
  • 1 cup blueberries, fresh or frozen
  • Serving suggestions: whipped cream and maple syrup.

Directions for Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes

  1. In a large bowl sift together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  2. Beat the eggs with the buttermilk and melted butter. Combine the dry and the wet ingredients into a lumpy batter, being careful not to over mix, see Cook’s Note*.
  3. Heat some butter in a skillet over medium heat. Spoon 1/3 cup of batter into the skillet and sprinkle the top with some of the blueberries. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes on each side.
  4. Serve with a dollop of whipped cream and maple syrup.

Bakeware for your recipe

You will find below are bakeware items that could be needed for this Blueberry Buttermilk Pancakes recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Healthy Breakfast
  • Breakfast – Breakfast is the first meal of the day eaten after waking from the night’s sleep, in the morning. The word in English refers to breaking the fasting period of the previous night. There is a strong likelihood for one or more “typical”, or “traditional”, breakfast menus to exist in most places, but their composition varies widely from place to place, and has varied over time, so that globally a very wide range of preparations and ingredients are now associated with breakfast.
  • Healthy – Health, according to the World Health Organization, is “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity”. A variety of definitions have been used for different purposes over time. Health can be promoted by encouraging healthful activities, such as regular physical exercise and adequate sleep, and by reducing or avoiding unhealthful activities or situations, such as smoking or excessive stress. Some factors affecting health are due to individual choices, such as whether to engage in a high-risk behavior, while others are due to structural causes, such as whether the society is arranged in a way that makes it easier or harder for people to get necessary healthcare services. Still other factors are beyond both individual and group choices, such as genetic disorders.
  • Healthy Brunch Recipes
  • Brunch – Brunch is a combination of breakfast and lunch and regularly has some form of alcoholic drink (most usually champagne or a cocktail) served with it. It is usually served between 9am and 1pm. The word is a portmanteau of breakfast and lunch. Brunch originated in England in the late 19th century and became popular in the United States in the 1930s.
  • Blueberry Pancake
  • Blueberry – See textBlueberries are a widely distributed and widespread group of perennial flowering plants with blue or purple berries. They are classified in the section Cyanococcus within the genus Vaccinium. Vaccinium also includes cranberries, bilberries, huckleberries and Madeira blueberries. Commercial blueberries—both wild (lowbush) and cultivated (highbush)—are all native to North America. The highbush varieties were introduced into Europe during the 1930s.Blueberries are usually prostrate shrubs that can vary in size from 10 centimeters (4 inches) to 4 meters (13 feet) in height. In commercial production of blueberries, the species with small, pea-size berries growing on low-level bushes are known as “lowbush blueberries” (synonymous with “wild”), while the species with larger berries growing on taller, cultivated bushes are known as “highbush blueberries”. Canada is the leading producer of lowbush blueberries, while the United States produces some 40% of the world supply of highbush blueberries.
  • Fruit – In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world’s agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Pancake – A pancake (or hotcake, griddlecake, or flapjack) is a flat cake, often thin and round, prepared from a starch-based batter that may contain eggs, milk and butter and cooked on a hot surface such as a griddle or frying pan, often frying with oil or butter. Archaeological evidence suggests that pancakes were probably the earliest and most widespread cereal food eaten in prehistoric societies.The pancake’s shape and structure varies worldwide. In the United Kingdom, pancakes are often unleavened and resemble a crêpe. In North America, a leavening agent is used (typically baking powder) creating a thick fluffy pancake. A crêpe is a thin Breton pancake of French origin cooked on one or both sides in a special pan or crepe maker to achieve a lacelike network of fine bubbles. A well-known variation originating from southeast Europe is a palačinke, a thin moist pancake fried on both sides and filled with jam, cream cheese, chocolate, or ground walnuts, but many other fillings—sweet or savoury—can also be used.When potato is used as a major portion of the batter, the result is a potato pancake. Commercially prepared pancake mixes are available in some countries. When buttermilk is used in place of or in addition to milk, the pancake develops a tart flavor and becomes known as a buttermilk pancake, which is common in Scotland and the US. Buckwheat flour can be used in a pancake batter, making for a type of buckwheat pancake, a category that includes Blini, Kaletez, Ploye, and Memil-buchimgae.Pancakes may be served at any time of the day or year with a variety of toppings or fillings, but they have developed associations with particular times and toppings in different regions. In North America, they are typically considered a breakfast food and serve a similar function to waffles. In Britain and the Commonwealth, they are associated with Shrove Tuesday, commonly known as “Pancake Day”, when, historically, perishable ingredients had to be used up before the fasting period of Lent.
  • American – American(s) may refer to:
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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