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Recipe for Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade. This dish qualifies as a Intermediate level recipe. It should take you about 55 min to make this recipe. The Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade recipe should make enough food for 4 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade recipe.

Ingredients for Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade

  • 1-pound fresh Alaskan halibut, cut into 4 (4-ounce) square pieces (Filet halibut in half if too thick)
  • 8 ounces fresh Alaska salmon, cut in 2-ounce rectangle pieces
  • 4 ounces Alaskan king crab leg and claw meat, cooked and extracted from shell
  • 4 ounces Brie cheese, including rind, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons each finely chopped fresh tarragon, chive, Italian parsley,
  • 4 tablespoons shallots, very small dice, divided
  • 1 pound yams, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced, plus 6 large cloves, roughly chopped
  • 5 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1-ounce extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 bottle Riesling, reserving – ounce
  • 1/2 pound whole butter, reserving 2 tablespoons, small dice
  • 1/2 pound assorted mushrooms, cleaned, halved or sliced
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 sprigs chives, 4 inches long, for garnish

Directions for Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Cut halibut and salmon into appropriate weights, cover each piece with plastic wrap and pound out with flat side of a meat tenderizer, or meat mallet, to 1/4-inch thickness. In a small bowl combine crabmeat, Brie cheese, 1 tablespoon fresh chopped herbs, 1 tablespoon shallot, 1 teaspoon minced garlic and salt and pepper, to taste. Season both sides of halibut with salt, pepper and some of the fresh herbs. Lay on an individual piece of plastic wrap, twice as big as the fish piece, flesh side down. Lay salmon piece on top of halibut, directly in the middle. Season with salt and pepper. Spread 1/4th of the crab and Brie mixture in the middle of the salmon. Do this with all 4 pieces of fish. Take plastic wrap that the fish is laying on and wrap fish into a tight roll, twisting the ends to make a “tube”. Refrigerate.
  3. Toss yams, roughly chopped garlic, thyme sprigs and olive oil in a bowl until completely coated. Season with salt and pepper. Spread evenly on a sheet pan and roast in a 350 degree F oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until tender. While yams are roasting combine Riesling and 2 tablespoons shallots in a small saucepan. Reduce by 3/4 over medium-low heat. Whisk in butter a little at a time until completely combined. Once all the butter is beaten in, remove from heat and season with salt. When yams have about 10 minutes left to finish, take fish rolls from the refrigerator and slice each roll into 3 or 5 equal sections. Remove plastic wrap after cutting and lay shingled out on well-greased sheet pan and put into oven with yams. When yams are done, fish should be done as well. While fish and yams are cooking, heat saute pan with 1 tablespoon whole butter. Once hot, drop mushrooms into pan and saute over medium-high heat until crispy and tender. Season with 1 tablespoon shallot, 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic, salt and pepper, to taste. Remove yams and fish from oven. Place a 3 or 4-inch ring mold in center of plate and fill with roasted yam hash, pressing down firmly. Remove ring mold. Place mushroom mixture on top of yam cake, allowing it to spill slightly over the side. Take fish roll and shingle in front and up yam cake, creating some height with the back piece of fish. Drizzle 1-ounce Riesling butter over front edges of fish slices. Garnish with 2 chive sprigs and serve.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Alaskan Halibut, Salmon and Crab Roulade recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Fish – Fish are aquatic, craniate, gill-bearing animals that lack limbs with digits. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Around 99% of living fish species are ray-finned fish, belonging to the class Actinopterygii, with over 95% belonging to the teleost subgrouping.The earliest organisms that can be classified as fish were soft-bodied chordates that first appeared during the Cambrian period. Although they lacked a true spine, they possessed notochords which allowed them to be more agile than their invertebrate counterparts. Fish would continue to evolve through the Paleozoic era, diversifying into a wide variety of forms. Many fish of the Paleozoic developed external armor that protected them from predators. The first fish with jaws appeared in the Silurian period, after which many (such as sharks) became formidable marine predators rather than just the prey of arthropods.Most fish are ectothermic (“cold-blooded”), allowing their body temperatures to vary as ambient temperatures change, though some of the large active swimmers like white shark and tuna can hold a higher core temperature. Fish can acoustically communicate with each other, most often in the context of feeding, aggression or courtship.Fish are abundant in most bodies of water. They can be found in nearly all aquatic environments, from high mountain streams (e.g., char and gudgeon) to the abyssal and even hadal depths of the deepest oceans (e.g., cusk-eels and snailfish), although no species has yet been documented in the deepest 25% of the ocean. With 34,300 described species, fish exhibit greater species diversity than any other group of vertebrates.Fish are an important resource for humans worldwide, especially as food. Commercial and subsistence fishers hunt fish in wild fisheries or farm them in ponds or in cages in the ocean (in aquaculture). They are also caught by recreational fishers, kept as pets, raised by fishkeepers, and exhibited in public aquaria. Fish have had a role in culture through the ages, serving as deities, religious symbols, and as the subjects of art, books and movies.Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term “fish” is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology, unless it is used in the cladistic sense, including tetrapods. The traditional term pisces (also ichthyes) is considered a typological, but not a phylogenetic classification.
  • Salmon – all other Oncorhynchus and Salmo speciesSalmon /ˈsæmən/ is the common name for several species of ray-finned fish in the family Salmonidae. Other fish in the same family include trout, char, grayling, and whitefish. Salmon are native to tributaries of the North Atlantic (genus Salmo) and Pacific Ocean (genus Oncorhynchus). Many species of salmon have been introduced into non-native environments such as the Great Lakes of North America and Patagonia in South America. Salmon are intensively farmed in many parts of the world.Typically, salmon are anadromous: they hatch in fresh water, migrate to the ocean, then return to fresh water to reproduce. However, populations of several species are restricted to fresh water throughout their lives. Folklore has it that the fish return to the exact spot where they hatched to spawn. Tracking studies have shown this to be mostly true. A portion of a returning salmon run may stray and spawn in different freshwater systems; the percent of straying depends on the species of salmon. Homing behavior has been shown to depend on olfactory memory.
  • Crab Recipes
  • Shellfish Recipes
  • Brie – Brie (/briː/; French: ) is a soft cow’s-milk cheese named after Brie, the French region from which it originated (roughly corresponding to the modern département of Seine-et-Marne). It is pale in color with a slight grayish tinge under a rind of white mould. The rind is typically eaten, with its flavor depending largely upon the ingredients used and its manufacturing environment. It is similar to Camembert, which is native to a different region of France.”Brie” is a style of cheese, and is not in itself a protected name, although some regional bries are protected.
  • Halibut Recipes
  • Main Dish
  • Roasting – Roasting is a cooking method that uses dry heat where hot air covers the food, cooking it evenly on all sides with temperatures of at least 150 °C (300 °F) from an open flame, oven, or other heat source. Roasting can enhance the flavor through caramelization and Maillard browning on the surface of the food. Roasting uses indirect, diffused heat (as in an oven), and is suitable for slower cooking of meat in a larger, whole piece. Meats and most root and bulb vegetables can be roasted. Any piece of meat, especially red meat, that has been cooked in this fashion is called a roast. Meats and vegetables prepared in this way are described as “roasted”, e.g., roasted chicken or roasted squash.
  • Gluten Free – A gluten-free diet (GFD) is a nutritional plan that strictly excludes gluten, which is a mixture of proteins found in wheat (and all of its species and hybrids, such as spelt, kamut, and triticale), as well as barley, rye, and oats. The inclusion of oats in a gluten-free diet remains controversial, and may depend on the oat cultivar and the frequent cross-contamination with other gluten-containing cereals.Gluten may cause both gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms for those with gluten-related disorders, including coeliac disease (CD), non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), gluten ataxia, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and wheat allergy. In these people, the gluten-free diet is demonstrated as an effective treatment, but several studies show that about 79% of the people with coeliac disease have an incomplete recovery of the small bowel, despite a strict gluten-free diet. This is mainly caused by inadvertent ingestion of gluten. People with a poor understanding of a gluten-free diet often believe that they are strictly following the diet, but are making regular errors.In addition, a gluten-free diet may, in at least some cases, improve gastrointestinal or systemic symptoms in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, or HIV enteropathy, among others. There is no good evidence that gluten-free diets are an alternative medical treatment for people with autism.Gluten proteins have low nutritional and biological value and the grains that contain gluten are not essential in the human diet. However, an unbalanced selection of food and an incorrect choice of gluten-free replacement products may lead to nutritional deficiencies. Replacing flour from wheat or other gluten-containing cereals with gluten-free flours in commercial products may lead to a lower intake of important nutrients, such as iron and B vitamins. Some gluten-free commercial replacement products are not enriched or fortified as their gluten-containing counterparts, and often have greater lipid/carbohydrate content. Children especially often over-consume these products, such as snacks and biscuits. Nutritional complications can be prevented by a correct dietary education.A gluten-free diet may be based on gluten-free foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, milk and dairy products, legumes, nuts, fruits, vegetables, potatoes, rice, and corn. Gluten-free processed foods may be used. Pseudocereals (quinoa, amaranth, and buckwheat) and some minor cereals are alternative choices.
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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