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Recipe for All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 30 min to make this recipe. The All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices recipe should make enough food for 4 to 6 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices recipe.

Ingredients for All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices

  • 1/4 cup smoked sweet paprika
  • 2 tablespoons ancho chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons light brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 pounds (21 to 24) large shrimp, shell on
  • 6 tablespoons canola oil, divided
  • 12 cloves coarsely chopped fresh garlic, divided
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onion

Directions for All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices

  1. Whisk together the paprika, ancho powder, brown sugar, cumin, salt and pepper in a small bowl.
  2. Place the shrimp in a large bowl, add the spice rub and stir well to coat each shrimp.
  3. Heat your grill to high. Heat 3 tablespoons of the oil on the grates of the grill over high heat in a large cast iron or saute pan; add half of the shrimp and half of the garlic and cook until just cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in half of the green onions and transfer to a large platter or turn out onto brown paper bags. Wipe out of the pan with paper towels, and repeat with the remaining ingredients.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this All You Can Eat Shrimp with Green Onion, Garlic and BBQ Spices recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Easy Shrimp Recipes
  • Shellfish Recipes
  • Shrimp – Shrimp are decapod crustaceans with elongated bodies and a primarily swimming mode of locomotion – most commonly Caridea and Dendrobranchiata. More narrow definitions may be restricted to Caridea, to smaller species of either group or to only the marine species. Under a broader definition, shrimp may be synonymous with prawn, covering stalk-eyed swimming crustaceans with long, narrow muscular tails (abdomens), long whiskers (antennae), and slender legs. Any small crustacean which resembles a shrimp tends to be called one. They swim forward by paddling with swimmerets on the underside of their abdomens, although their escape response is typically repeated flicks with the tail driving them backwards very quickly. Crabs and lobsters have strong walking legs, whereas shrimp have thin, fragile legs which they use primarily for perching.Shrimp are widespread and abundant. There are thousands of species adapted to a wide range of habitats. They can be found feeding near the seafloor on most coasts and estuaries, as well as in rivers and lakes. To escape predators, some species flip off the seafloor and dive into the sediment. They usually live from one to seven years. Shrimp are often solitary, though they can form large schools during the spawning season.They play important roles in the food chain and are an important food source for larger animals ranging from fish to whales. The muscular tails of many shrimp are edible to humans, and they are widely caught and farmed for human consumption. Commercial shrimp species support an industry worth 50 billion dollars a year, and in 2010 the total commercial production of shrimp was nearly 7 million tonnes. Shrimp farming became more prevalent during the 1980s, particularly in China, and by 2007 the harvest from shrimp farms exceeded the capture of wild shrimp. There are significant issues with excessive bycatch when shrimp are captured in the wild, and with pollution damage done to estuaries when they are used to support shrimp farming. Many shrimp species are small as the term shrimp suggests, about 2 cm (0.79 in) long, but some shrimp exceed 25 cm (9.8 in). Larger shrimp are more likely to be targeted commercially and are often referred to as prawns, particularly in Britain.
  • Easy Appetizer
  • Appetizer – An hors d’oeuvre (/ɔːr ˈdɜːrv(rə)/ or DURV(-rə); French: hors-d’œuvre (listen)), appetizer or starter is a small dish served before a meal in European cuisine. Some hors d’oeuvres are served cold, others hot. Hors d’oeuvres may be served at the dinner table as a part of the meal, or they may be served before seating, such as at a reception or cocktail party. Formerly, hors d’oeuvres were also served between courses.Typically smaller than a main dish, an hors d’oeuvre is often designed to be eaten by hand.
  • Easy Main Dish
  • Main Dish
  • Easy Grilling Recipes and Tips
  • Grilling – Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above, below or from the side. Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), using a cast iron/frying pan, or a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill).Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is called broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is through thermal radiation.Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma and flavor from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens.Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds. Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oils, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.
  • Grilled Shrimp

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

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