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Recipe for Abc Noodle Soup by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Abc Noodle Soup by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Abc Noodle Soup. It should take you about 1 hr to make this recipe. The Abc Noodle Soup recipe should make enough food for 4 to 6 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Abc Noodle Soup recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Abc Noodle Soup recipe.

Ingredients for Abc Noodle Soup

  • 1 medium onion, diced (about 1 cup)
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups carrots, peeled and diced
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 1 cup miniature alphabet pasta

Directions for Abc Noodle Soup

  1. In a large stockpot, saute the onions in the vegetable oil over medium heat until translucent (about 5 to 8 minutes). Add the carrots and chicken stock, cover the pot, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the celery and simmer another 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  2. Turn off the heat and stir in the pasta. Cover the pot and let sit for 20 minutes.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Abc Noodle Soup recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Carrot Soup
  • Vegetable Soup – Vegetable soup is a common soup prepared using vegetables and leaf vegetables as primary ingredients. It dates to ancient history, and is a mass-produced food product in contemporary times.
  • Carrot Recipes
  • Soup – Soup is a primarily liquid food, generally served warm or hot (but may be cool or cold), that is made by combining ingredients of meat or vegetables with stock, milk, or water. Hot soups are additionally characterized by boiling solid ingredients in liquids in a pot until the flavors are extracted, forming a broth. Soups are similar to stews, and in some cases there may not be a clear distinction between the two; however, soups generally have more liquid (broth) than stews.In traditional French cuisine, soups are classified into two main groups: clear soups and thick soups. The established French classifications of clear soups are bouillon and consommé. Thick soups are classified depending upon the type of thickening agent used: purées are vegetable soups thickened with starch; bisques are made from puréed shellfish or vegetables thickened with cream; cream soups may be thickened with béchamel sauce; and veloutés are thickened with eggs, butter, and cream. Other ingredients commonly used to thicken soups and broths include rice, lentils, flour, and grains; many popular soups also include pumpkin, carrots, potatoes, pig’s trotters and bird’s nests.Other types of soup include fruit soups, dessert soups, pulse soups like split pea, cold soups and other styles.
  • American – American(s) may refer to:
  • Celery – Celery (Apium graveolens) is a marshland plant in the family Apiaceae that has been cultivated as a vegetable since antiquity. Celery has a long fibrous stalk tapering into leaves. Depending on location and cultivar, either its stalks, leaves or hypocotyl are eaten and used in cooking. Celery is also used as a spice and its extracts have been used in herbal medicine.
  • Noodles – Noodles are a type of food made from unleavened dough which is rolled flat and cut, stretched or extruded, into long strips or strings. Noodles can be refrigerated for short-term storage or dried and stored for future use.Noodles are usually cooked in boiling water, sometimes with cooking oil or salt added. They are also often pan-fried or deep-fried. Noodle dishes can include a sauce or noodles can be put into soup. The material composition and geocultural origin is specific to each type of a wide variety of noodles. Noodles are a staple food in many cultures (see Chinese noodles, Japanese noodles, Korean noodles, Filipino noodles, Vietnamese noodles, and Italian pasta).
  • Winter – Winter is the coldest season of the year in polar and temperate zones. It occurs after autumn and before spring in each year. Winter is caused by the axis of the Earth in that hemisphere being oriented away from the Sun. Different cultures define different dates as the start of winter, and some use a definition based on weather. When it is winter in the Northern Hemisphere, it is summer in the Southern Hemisphere, and vice versa. In many regions, winter is associated with snow and freezing temperatures. The moment of winter solstice is when the Sun’s elevation with respect to the North or South Pole is at its most negative value (that is, the Sun is at its farthest below the horizon as measured from the pole). The day on which this occurs has the shortest day and the longest night, with day length increasing and night length decreasing as the season progresses after the solstice. The earliest sunset and latest sunrise dates outside the polar regions differ from the date of the winter solstice, however, and these depend on latitude, due to the variation in the solar day throughout the year caused by the Earth’s elliptical orbit (see earliest and latest sunrise and sunset).
  • Sauteing Recipes
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

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