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Recipe for 10-inch French Meat Pie by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for 10-inch French Meat Pie by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect 10-inch French Meat Pie. This dish qualifies as a Intermediate level recipe. It should take you about 2 hr to make this recipe. The 10-inch French Meat Pie recipe should make enough food for 6 to 8 servings depending on slice size.

You can add your own personal twist to this 10-inch French Meat Pie recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential bakeware items that might be necessary for this 10-inch French Meat Pie recipe.

Ingredients for 10-inch French Meat Pie

  • 5 1/4 ounces all-purpose vegetable shortening
  • 8 1/4 ounces unbleached pastry flour
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons cold tap water
  • Salt
  • 9 ounces 1/2-inch diced potato
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 9 ounces finely ground pork
  • 9 ounces 1/4-inch diced onion
  • 1 7/8 teaspoons beef soup base, prepared according to package instructions
  • 3 tablespoons, plus 1 1/2 teaspoons instant potato powder
  • 3/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Egg wash, for topping

Directions for 10-inch French Meat Pie

  1. For the Dough:
  2. The dough can be made in advance. You will need 1 pound of dough to make this pie. Blend the shortening, flour and cold water together in the bowl of a stand mixer on low speed, using a dough hook. Mix until well blended. Remove the dough from the bowl, wrap in plastic wrap and put it on a sheet pan. The dough can be stored for up to 1 week in the refrigerator, but allow it to come to room temperature before rolling.
  3. Cut the dough in half and roll out 1 piece of dough to fit into a 10-inch pie plate. Fit the dough circle into the bottom of the pie pan, pushing it snugly against the edges. Roll out the other piece of dough and set aside until ready to use.
  4. For the Filling:
  5. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  6. Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil over medium heat. Add the potatoes and blanch until al dente. Drain and set aside to cool.
  7. In a large skillet over medium heat, add the beef, pork, and the onions. Brown the meat, then discard the grease. Add the potatoes and moisten the mixture with the beef soup base, as needed. Use the instant potato to tighten the mixture, if needed. Season with cinnamon, nutmeg, garlic, black pepper and 1/4 teaspoon salt.
  8. Pour the filling into the dough-lined pie plate. Level it off and cover with the remaining circle of dough. Pinch the edges of the bottom layer and top layer of dough together and create the knuckle-like pie edge ridges. Trim off any excess dough using a sharp knife.
  9. Brush the top of the pie with the egg wash. Make a few slits in the top crust to allow the steam to escape.
  10. Bake until cooked through and the top of the pie is golden brown, about 45 minutes.
  11. Remove from the oven and serve.

Bakeware for your recipe

You will find below are bakeware items that could be needed for this 10-inch French Meat Pie recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • French Recipes
  • Pot Pie Recipes
  • Beef – Beef is the culinary name for meat from cattle.In prehistoric times, humans hunted aurochs and later domesticated them. Since then, numerous breeds of cattle have been bred specifically for the quality or quantity of their meat. Today, beef is the third most widely consumed meat in the world, after pork and poultry. As of 2018, the United States, Brazil, and China were the largest producers of beef.Beef can be prepared in various ways; cuts are often used for steak, which can be cooked to varying degrees of doneness, while trimmings are often ground or minced, as found in most hamburgers. Beef contains protein, iron, and vitamin B12. Along with other kinds of red meat, high consumption is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer and coronary heart disease, especially when processed. Beef has a high environmental impact, being a primary driver of deforestation with the highest greenhouse gas emissions of any agricultural product.
  • Pork – Pork is the culinary name for the meat of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.Pork is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork.Pork is the most popular meat in the Western world and in Central Europe. It is also very popular in East and Southeast Asia (Mainland Southeast Asia, Philippines, Singapore, East Timor, and Malaysia). It is highly prized in Asian cuisines, especially in China, for its fat content and texture.Some religions and cultures prohibit pork consumption, notably Islam and Judaism.
  • Potato – The potato is a starchy tuber of the plant Solanum tuberosum and is a root vegetable native to the Americas, with the plant itself being a perennial in the nightshade family Solanaceae.Wild potato species, originating in modern-day Peru, can be found throughout the Americas, from Canada to southern Chile. The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated by Native Americans independently in multiple locations, but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species traced a single origin for potatoes, in the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia. Potatoes were domesticated approximately 7,000–10,000 years ago there, from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex. In the Andes region of South America, where the species is indigenous, some close relatives of the potato are cultivated.Potatoes were introduced to Europe from the Americas in the second half of the 16th century by the Spanish. Today they are a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world’s food supply. As of 2014, potatoes were the world’s fourth-largest food crop after maize (corn), wheat, and rice. Following millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 5,000 different types of potatoes. Over 99% of presently cultivated potatoes worldwide descended from varieties that originated in the lowlands of south-central Chile. The importance of the potato as a food source and culinary ingredient varies by region and is still changing. It remains an essential crop in Europe, especially Northern and Eastern Europe, where per capita production is still the highest in the world, while the most rapid expansion in production over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia, with China and India leading the world in overall production as of 2018.Like the tomato, the potato is a nightshade in the genus Solanum, and the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine which is dangerous for human consumption. Normal potato tubers that have been grown and stored properly produce glycoalkaloids in amounts small enough to be negligible to human health, but if green sections of the plant (namely sprouts and skins) are exposed to light, the tuber can accumulate a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health.
  • Main Dish
  • Sauteing Recipes
  • Recipes for a Crowd
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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