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Recipe for Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. The Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise recipe should make enough food for 4 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise recipe.

Ingredients for Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise

  • 6 cups water
  • Freshly ground salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • Freshly ground white pepper
  • 1/2 pound egg noodles
  • 3 cups ice water
  • 3/4 cup clarified butter
  • 4 serrano chiles, seeded and cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 12 ounces veal tenderloin, trimmed and cut into 3/4-inch slices
  • 12 ounces pork tenderloin, trimmed and cut into 3/4-inch slices
  • 12 ounces beef tenderloin, trimmed and cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 1/4 cup brandy
  • 4 ounces mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup salted butter
  • 10 ounces sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley

Directions for Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise

  1. Bring 6 cups water to boil and season with salt and pepper. Add noodles and cook for 6 minutes. When done, pour in 3 cups ice water to stop boiling. Strain but do not rinse. Cover and let rest.
  2. Meanwhile, heat clarified butter in large pan over low heat. Add chile, garlic, oregano, and bay leaf and cook gently. Strain butter and reserve.
  3. Pour 1/2 clarified butter into frying pan on medium heat. Add veal and pork and season with salt and pepper. Let simmer. Cook on both sides.
  4. In another pan, cook beef in remaining clarified butter over high heat and season with salt and pepper, turning once. Add brandy, flame pan, and add all to pan with veal and pork. To the pan that the beef was cooked in, add mushrooms and stir in 1-ounce fresh butter. Season with salt and pepper. Cook on medium heat, then add noodles on top of mushrooms and gently mix the 2 together. Stir in remaining butter.
  5. Transfer meat with slotted spoon to 1 side of serving platter. Pour liquid in pan into noodles and mushrooms. Mix in sour cream and reheat. Serve alongside meat. Dust with parsley and serve.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Ademas Dos Saute Gourmandise recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Easy Main Dish
  • Main Dish
  • Beef – Beef is the culinary name for meat from cattle.In prehistoric times, humans hunted aurochs and later domesticated them. Since then, numerous breeds of cattle have been bred specifically for the quality or quantity of their meat. Today, beef is the third most widely consumed meat in the world, after pork and poultry. As of 2018, the United States, Brazil, and China were the largest producers of beef.Beef can be prepared in various ways; cuts are often used for steak, which can be cooked to varying degrees of doneness, while trimmings are often ground or minced, as found in most hamburgers. Beef contains protein, iron, and vitamin B12. Along with other kinds of red meat, high consumption is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer and coronary heart disease, especially when processed. Beef has a high environmental impact, being a primary driver of deforestation with the highest greenhouse gas emissions of any agricultural product.
  • Noodles – Noodles are a type of food made from unleavened dough which is rolled flat and cut, stretched or extruded, into long strips or strings. Noodles can be refrigerated for short-term storage or dried and stored for future use.Noodles are usually cooked in boiling water, sometimes with cooking oil or salt added. They are also often pan-fried or deep-fried. Noodle dishes can include a sauce or noodles can be put into soup. The material composition and geocultural origin is specific to each type of a wide variety of noodles. Noodles are a staple food in many cultures (see Chinese noodles, Japanese noodles, Korean noodles, Filipino noodles, Vietnamese noodles, and Italian pasta).
  • Pork – Pork is the culinary name for the meat of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.Pork is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork.Pork is the most popular meat in the Western world and in Central Europe. It is also very popular in East and Southeast Asia (Mainland Southeast Asia, Philippines, Singapore, East Timor, and Malaysia). It is highly prized in Asian cuisines, especially in China, for its fat content and texture.Some religions and cultures prohibit pork consumption, notably Islam and Judaism.
  • Dairy Recipes
  • Mushroom – A mushroom or toadstool is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground, on soil, or on its food source.The standard for the name “mushroom” is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word “mushroom” is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap. “Mushroom” also describes a variety of other gilled fungi, with or without stems, therefore the term is used to describe the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota. These gills produce microscopic spores that help the fungus spread across the ground or its occupant surface.Forms deviating from the standard morphology usually have more specific names, such as “bolete”, “puffball”, “stinkhorn”, and “morel”, and gilled mushrooms themselves are often called “agarics” in reference to their similarity to Agaricus or their order Agaricales. By extension, the term “mushroom” can also refer to either the entire fungus when in culture, the thallus (called a mycelium) of species forming the fruiting bodies called mushrooms, or the species itself.
  • Brandy – Brandy is a liquor produced by distilling wine. Brandy generally contains 35–60% alcohol by volume (70–120 US proof) and is typically consumed as an after-dinner digestif. Some brandies are aged in wooden casks. Others are coloured with caramel colouring to imitate the effect of aging, and some are produced using a combination of both aging and colouring. Varieties of wine brandy can be found across the winemaking world. Among the most renowned are Cognac and Armagnac from southwestern France.In a broader sense, the term brandy also denotes liquors obtained from the distillation of pomace (yielding pomace brandy), or mash or wine of any other fruit (fruit brandy). These products are also called eau de vie (which translates to “water of life”).
  • Veal – Veal is the meat of calves, in contrast to the beef from older cattle. Veal can be produced from a calf of either sex and any breed, however most veal comes from young male calves of dairy breeds which are not used for breeding. Generally, veal is more expensive per pound than beef from older cattle. Veal production is a way to add value to dairy bull calves and to utilize whey solids, a byproduct from the manufacturing of cheese.
  • Sauteing Recipes
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

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