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Recipe for Alcapurias by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Alcapurias by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Alcapurias. This dish qualifies as a Intermediate level recipe. It should take you about 1 hr to make this recipe. The Alcapurias recipe should make enough food for 30 or so depending on the size.

You can add your own personal twist to this Alcapurias recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Alcapurias recipe.

Ingredients for Alcapurias

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon annatto seeds
  • 1 pound yautia (root vegetable), peeled and chopped
  • 1 medium green plantain peeled and chopped
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons sofrito, (recommended my brand Sofrito, alternatively, Goya Sofrito)
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1/2 packet Latin seasoning mix (recommended: Sazon)
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 cup beef stock, (recommended, boxed organic)
  • 1/2 cup raisins, soaked in dark Puerto Rican rum
  • Oil, for frying

Directions for Alcapurias

  1. In a small saucepan heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil with the annatto seeds until the olive oil changes color; it should be a mild orange/red. Strain and set aside.
  2. Using a food processor, process the yautia and green plantain on medium speed until nice and smooth; add the salt and strained annatto oil. Now you have a fresh masa; place in the refrigerator.
  3. Preheat a large Dutch oven on medium-high heat. Add the remaining tablespoon of olive oil and sofrito. Stir-fry for 1 minute and add the ground beef. Brown the beef and add the Latin seasoning mix, garlic powder, onion powder and oregano mixing well. Add the beef stock and simmer on medium-low for 10 minutes. Remove the beef from the heat, strain the raisins and add them to the beef mixture mixing well. Set aside to cool.
  4. Remove the masa from the refrigerator and using 1 to 2 tablespoons (depending on how large you want them) scoop out of the bowl and into the palm of your water moistened hand patting into a round disk to prepare it for the filling (the masa can be a little too pliable; if you notice that you can’t form a round disk, place the masa in the refrigerator to firm it up before proceeding). Add a teaspoon or more of beef mixture to the center of the masa and using a patting motion (as if you were making a snow ball) pat the masa around the beef to form a ball being very careful not to let the beef stick out of the plantain. Continue forming the balls until both mixtures are finished. Leftovers of either can be saved for your next meal (I’ll show you what to do with them in a future recipe).
  5. Preheat a large Dutch oven on high and add enough oil to comfortably fry the Alcapurias (about 2 to 3 cups). (Heat the oil to 350 degrees F if you are frying them fresh; if frozen, lower the temperature to 325 degrees F.) When the oil has reached the desired temperature, carefully add the alcapurias 1 at a time making sure not to crowd the pan. Remove and drain on a thick bed of paper towels; transfer to a cooling rack once drained and store in a warm oven until you have completed frying them all.
  6. To serve: Alcapurias can be placed on a dish and passed around to your guests or on a serving platter and placed on your buffet. They do not require a sauce, topping or dip of any kind. Their unique taste will carry them on your buffet all on their own!

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Alcapurias recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Caribbean – The Caribbean (/ˌkærɪˈbiːən, kəˈrɪbiən/, locally /ˈkærɪbiæn/; Spanish: Caribe; French: Caraïbes; Haitian Creole: Karayib; also Antillean Creole: Kawayib; Dutch: Caraïben; Papiamento: Karibe) is a region of the Americas that comprises the Caribbean Sea, its surrounding coasts, and its islands (some of which lie within the Caribbean Sea and some of which lie on the edge of the Caribbean Sea where it borders the North Atlantic Ocean). The region lies southeast of the Gulf of Mexico and of the North American mainland, east of Central America, and north of South America.The region, situated largely on the Caribbean Plate, has more than 700 islands, islets, reefs and cays (see the list of Caribbean islands). Three island arcs delineate the eastern and northern edges of the Caribbean Sea: The Greater Antilles to the north, and the Lesser Antilles and Leeward Antilles to the south and east. Together with the nearby Lucayan Archipelago, these island arcs make up the West Indies. The Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands are sometimes considered to be a part of the Caribbean, even though they are neither within the Caribbean Sea nor on its border. However, The Bahamas is a full member state of the Caribbean Community and the Turks and Caicos Islands are an associate member. Belize, Guyana, and Suriname are also considered part of the Caribbean despite being mainland countries and they are full member states of the Caribbean Community and the Association of Caribbean States. Several regions of mainland South and Central America are also often seen as part of the Caribbean because of their political and cultural ties with the region. These include: Belize, the Caribbean region of Colombia, the Venezuelan Caribbean, Quintana Roo in Mexico (consisting of Cozumel and the Caribbean coast of the Yucatán Peninsula), and The Guianas (Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, Guayana Region in Venezuela, and Amapá in Brazil).A mostly tropical geography, the climates are greatly shaped by sea temperatures and precipitation, with the hurricane season regularly leading to natural disasters. Because of its tropical climate and low-lying island geography, the Caribbean is vulnerable to a number of climate change effects, including increased storm intensity, saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and coastal erosion, and precipitation variability. These weather changes will greatly change the economies of the islands, and especially the major industries of agricultural and tourism.The Caribbean was occupied by indigenous people since at least 6000 BC. When European colonization followed the arrival of Columbus in Hispaniola, the population was quickly decimated by brutal labour practices, enslavement and disease and on many islands, Europeans supplanted the native populations with enslaved Africans.: 4–6  Following the independence of Haiti from France in the early 19th century and the decline of slavery in the 19th century, island nations in the Caribbean gradually gained independence, with a wave of new states during the 1950s and 60s. Because of the proximity to the United States, there is also a long history of United States intervention in the region.The islands of the Caribbean (the West Indies) are often regarded as a subregion of North America, though sometimes they are included in Middle America or then left as a subregion of their own and are organized into 30 territories including sovereign states, overseas departments, and dependencies. From 15 December 1954, to 10 October 2010, there was a country known as the Netherlands Antilles composed of five states, all of which were Dutch dependencies. From 3 January 1958, to 31 May 1962, there was also a political union called the West Indies Federation composed of ten English-speaking Caribbean territories, all of which were then British dependencies.
  • Puerto Rican Recipes
  • Fruit – In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world’s agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Orange Recipes
  • Raisin Recipes
  • Plantain Recipes
  • Appetizer – An hors d’oeuvre (/ɔːr ˈdɜːrv(rə)/ or DURV(-rə); French: hors-d’œuvre (listen)), appetizer or starter is a small dish served before a meal in European cuisine. Some hors d’oeuvres are served cold, others hot. Hors d’oeuvres may be served at the dinner table as a part of the meal, or they may be served before seating, such as at a reception or cocktail party. Formerly, hors d’oeuvres were also served between courses.Typically smaller than a main dish, an hors d’oeuvre is often designed to be eaten by hand.
  • Deep-Frying
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Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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