Search
Close this search box.

Recipe for Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce by Dawn’s Recipes

Table of Contents

Recipe for Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce. This dish qualifies as a Intermediate level recipe. It should take you about 2 hr 30 min to make this recipe. The Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce recipe should make enough food for 4 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce recipe.

Ingredients for Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce

  • 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 (6-ounce) salmon fillets, skinned
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 cedar or alder planks, or 2 untreated cedar shingles or shims (available at lumberyards), about 5 inches wide and 12 inches long, soaked at least 2 hours, or overnight, so as not to flame up
  • Olive oil
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 8 pieces
  • 1 teaspoon minced shallots or scallions
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1/4 cup fish stock, chicken stock or low-salt canned chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot sauce (recommended: Tabasco)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 hard-cooked eggs, coarsely grated or chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh chives, optional
  • 1 tablespoon Californian sturgeon caviar, optional

Directions for Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce

  1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.
  2. In a small saucepan, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. Add shallots and saute 1 minute. Season with a pinch of salt. Add lemon juice, wine, stock and cream. Simmer over medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes, until reduced to about 2 tablespoons.
  3. Lower the heat and whisk in the remaining butter 1 tablespoon at a time, adding each piece when the previous one is almost melted.
  4. Add hot sauce and season with salt and pepper to taste. Strain the sauce through a fine sieve, into a bowl. Cover to keep warm until ready to serve.
  5. Mix together the mustard powder, salt, and pepper. Brush the top of the salmon fillets with the melted butter. Season both sides with the mustard mixture and set aside.
  6. Put the soaked shingles in the oven, directly on the racks, for about 3 to 5 minutes until the wood is lightly browned on top. Carefully take the shingles out of the oven and place them on a heat-proof surface.
  7. Turn on the oven broiler.
  8. Immediately brush the shingles with a thin layer of olive oil and lay the salmon fillets, skinned side down, on the browned side of each shingle. Place the shingles under the broiler and cook the fish for about 5 to 7 minutes, until firm but not dry. Remove the fillets to a platter or serve directly from the shingles.
  9. Just before serving, stir the parsley and grated eggs into the reserved warm egg sauce. Fold in chives and caviar if using. Top the fillets with the egg sauce and a sprinkling of chives, and a dollop of caviar if using.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Alder-Planked Salmon with Egg Sauce recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Dairy Recipes
  • Shallot Recipes
  • Fish – Fish are aquatic, craniate, gill-bearing animals that lack limbs with digits. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Around 99% of living fish species are ray-finned fish, belonging to the class Actinopterygii, with over 95% belonging to the teleost subgrouping.The earliest organisms that can be classified as fish were soft-bodied chordates that first appeared during the Cambrian period. Although they lacked a true spine, they possessed notochords which allowed them to be more agile than their invertebrate counterparts. Fish would continue to evolve through the Paleozoic era, diversifying into a wide variety of forms. Many fish of the Paleozoic developed external armor that protected them from predators. The first fish with jaws appeared in the Silurian period, after which many (such as sharks) became formidable marine predators rather than just the prey of arthropods.Most fish are ectothermic (“cold-blooded”), allowing their body temperatures to vary as ambient temperatures change, though some of the large active swimmers like white shark and tuna can hold a higher core temperature. Fish can acoustically communicate with each other, most often in the context of feeding, aggression or courtship.Fish are abundant in most bodies of water. They can be found in nearly all aquatic environments, from high mountain streams (e.g., char and gudgeon) to the abyssal and even hadal depths of the deepest oceans (e.g., cusk-eels and snailfish), although no species has yet been documented in the deepest 25% of the ocean. With 34,300 described species, fish exhibit greater species diversity than any other group of vertebrates.Fish are an important resource for humans worldwide, especially as food. Commercial and subsistence fishers hunt fish in wild fisheries or farm them in ponds or in cages in the ocean (in aquaculture). They are also caught by recreational fishers, kept as pets, raised by fishkeepers, and exhibited in public aquaria. Fish have had a role in culture through the ages, serving as deities, religious symbols, and as the subjects of art, books and movies.Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term “fish” is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology, unless it is used in the cladistic sense, including tetrapods. The traditional term pisces (also ichthyes) is considered a typological, but not a phylogenetic classification.
  • Salmon – all other Oncorhynchus and Salmo speciesSalmon /ˈsæmən/ is the common name for several species of ray-finned fish in the family Salmonidae. Other fish in the same family include trout, char, grayling, and whitefish. Salmon are native to tributaries of the North Atlantic (genus Salmo) and Pacific Ocean (genus Oncorhynchus). Many species of salmon have been introduced into non-native environments such as the Great Lakes of North America and Patagonia in South America. Salmon are intensively farmed in many parts of the world.Typically, salmon are anadromous: they hatch in fresh water, migrate to the ocean, then return to fresh water to reproduce. However, populations of several species are restricted to fresh water throughout their lives. Folklore has it that the fish return to the exact spot where they hatched to spawn. Tracking studies have shown this to be mostly true. A portion of a returning salmon run may stray and spawn in different freshwater systems; the percent of straying depends on the species of salmon. Homing behavior has been shown to depend on olfactory memory.
  • Sturgeon Recipes
  • Egg Recipes
  • Chicken Recipes
  • Poultry – Poultry (/ˈpoʊltri/) are domesticated birds kept by humans for their eggs, their meat or their feathers. These birds are most typically members of the superorder Galloanserae (fowl), especially the order Galliformes (which includes chickens, quails, and turkeys). The term also includes birds that are killed for their meat, such as the young of pigeons (known as squabs) but does not include similar wild birds hunted for sport or food and known as game. The word “poultry” comes from the French/Norman word poule, itself derived from the Latin word pullus, which means small animal.The domestication of poultry took place around 5,400 years ago in Southeast Asia. This may have originally been as a result of people hatching and rearing young birds from eggs collected from the wild, but later involved keeping the birds permanently in captivity. Domesticated chickens may have been used for cockfighting at first and quail kept for their songs, but soon it was realised how useful it was having a captive-bred source of food. Selective breeding for fast growth, egg-laying ability, conformation, plumage and docility took place over the centuries, and modern breeds often look very different from their wild ancestors. Although some birds are still kept in small flocks in extensive systems, most birds available in the market today are reared in intensive commercial enterprises.Together with pig meat, poultry is one of the two most widely eaten types of meat globally, with over 70% of the meat supply in 2012 between them; poultry provides nutritionally beneficial food containing high-quality protein accompanied by a low proportion of fat. All poultry meat should be properly handled and sufficiently cooked in order to reduce the risk of food poisoning. Semi-vegetarians who consume poultry as the only source of meat are said to adhere to pollotarianism.The word “poultry” comes from the West & English “pultrie”, from Old French pouletrie, from pouletier, poultry dealer, from poulet, pullet. The word “pullet” itself comes from Middle English pulet, from Old French polet, both from Latin pullus, a young fowl, young animal or chicken. The word “fowl” is of Germanic origin (cf. Old English Fugol, German Vogel, Danish Fugl).
  • Caviar – Caviar (also known as caviare; from Persian: خاویار‎, romanized: khâvyâr, lit. ’egg-bearing’) is a food consisting of salt-cured roe of the family Acipenseridae. Caviar is considered a delicacy and is eaten as a garnish or a spread. Traditionally, the term caviar refers only to roe from wild sturgeon in the Caspian Sea and Black Sea (Beluga, Ossetra and Sevruga caviars). Depending on the country, caviar may also be used to describe the roe of other species of sturgeon or other fish such as salmon, steelhead, trout, lumpfish, whitefish, or carp.The roe can be “fresh” (non-pasteurized) or pasteurized, with pasteurization reducing its culinary and economic value.
  • Main Dish
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

Looking for some cooking inspiration?

Why not subscribe to our monthly recipe list? From seasonal recipes to new cooking trends that are worth trying, you will get it all and more right to your inbox. You can either follow the recipes exactly or use them as inspiration to create your own dishes. And the best part? It’s free!

recipe