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Recipe for Antipasto Platter by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Antipasto Platter by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Antipasto Platter. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 1 hr 15 min to make this recipe. The Antipasto Platter recipe should make enough food for 8 to 10 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Antipasto Platter recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Antipasto Platter recipe.

Ingredients for Antipasto Platter

  • 2 zucchini, sliced lengthwise into 1/4-inch thick planks
  • 1 red pepper, cheeks removed from 3 sides
  • 1 eggplant, sliced into 1/4-inch thick circles
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons good quality aged balsamic vinegar
  • 1 loaf country sourdough, cut into 3/4-inch thick slices
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup pine nuts
  • 1/2 cup orange blossom honey
  • 2 cups good-quality whole milk ricotta
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh mint leaves, hand torn
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 pounds mixed olives (queen, kalamata, ceringola)
  • 1/2 pound finely sliced San Daniele ham
  • One 8-ounce wheel Mt. Tam Triple Cream
  • One 12-ounce Cypress Grove Chevre Truffle Tremor
  • One 8-ounce wedge aged Monterey Jack cheese

Directions for Antipasto Platter

  1. For the vegetables: Heat a cast iron grill pan over high heat until smoking, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add the vegetables to a large bowl, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Grill the vegetables on the hot grill pan for 2 to 3 minutes per side, without moving so they get nice grill marks. Remove to a large platter and drizzle with aged balsamic vinegar.
  2. For the sourdough: Heat a cast iron grill pan over high heat until smoking, about 8 to 10 minutes. Drizzle the bread slices with olive oil and arrange on the hot grill pan for 2 to 3 minutes per side, without moving so they get nice grill marks and toast evenly.
  3. For the ricotta spread: Begin by toasting the pine nuts in a dry skillet over medium heat. Toss over low heat until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to low and add the honey. Mix well so the nuts get coated evenly and honey melts. Allow to cool slightly, then add to a large bowl. Add the ricotta, olive oil, mint and salt and pepper, to taste. Refrigerate until the ricotta firms up a little before serving with grilled sourdough and antipasto items.
  4. For the platter: Arrange the grilled vegetables, grilled sourdough, ricotta, olives, prosciutto and cheese on a large platter and serve.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Antipasto Platter recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Easy Appetizer
  • Appetizer – An hors d’oeuvre (/ɔːr ˈdɜːrv(rə)/ or DURV(-rə); French: hors-d’œuvre (listen)), appetizer or starter is a small dish served before a meal in European cuisine. Some hors d’oeuvres are served cold, others hot. Hors d’oeuvres may be served at the dinner table as a part of the meal, or they may be served before seating, such as at a reception or cocktail party. Formerly, hors d’oeuvres were also served between courses.Typically smaller than a main dish, an hors d’oeuvre is often designed to be eaten by hand.
  • Easy Grilling Recipes and Tips
  • Grilling – Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above, below or from the side. Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), using a cast iron/frying pan, or a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill).Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is called broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is through thermal radiation.Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma and flavor from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens.Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds. Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oils, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.
  • Italian
  • Olive Recipes
  • Recipes for Parties
  • Recipes for a Crowd
  • High Fiber
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

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