Search
Close this search box.

Recipe for Apple and Mortadella Stuffing by Dawn’s Recipes

Table of Contents

Recipe for Apple and Mortadella Stuffing by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Apple and Mortadella Stuffing. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 1 hr 10 min to make this recipe. The Apple and Mortadella Stuffing recipe should make enough food for 8 to 10 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Apple and Mortadella Stuffing recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Apple and Mortadella Stuffing recipe.

Ingredients for Apple and Mortadella Stuffing

  • 1/3 cup raisins
  • 4 1/2 cups apple cider
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 medium onion, diced (about 1 cup)
  • 3 celery stalks, split lengthwise and cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 3 tablespoons pine nuts
  • 8 ounces mortadella, cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • 1 cup pitted and coarsely chopped green olives
  • 2 apples, peeled, cored, and diced
  • 6 fresh sage leaves, chopped
  • 6 cups day-old sourdough bread (crusts removed), cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Directions for Apple and Mortadella Stuffing

  1. To plump the raisins, combine them with the apple cider in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Immediately remove from the heat and set aside.
  2. In a large, nonreactive saucepan or Dutch oven, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onion, celery, and pine nuts. Cook, stirring occasionally, without coloring, 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. Add the mortadella, olives, apples, and sage and cook 5 more minutes.
  4. Strain the raisins, reserving the cider, and add the raisins to the saucepan. Stir in the bread cubes, season with the salt and pepper, and add reserved cider. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir thoroughly, cover, and continue cooking for an additional 15 minutes. The stuffing will be very moist. Serve hot. The stuffing can be kept hot and held for up to 1 hour in a bain-marie.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Apple and Mortadella Stuffing recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Easy Side Dish Recipes
  • Side Dish – A side dish, sometimes referred to as a side order, side item, or simply a side, is a food item that accompanies the entrée or main course at a meal.
  • Thanksgiving Stuffing and Dressing
  • Stuffing – Stuffing, filling, or dressing is an edible mixture, often composed of herbs and a starch such as bread, used to fill a cavity in the preparation of another food item. Many foods may be stuffed, including poultry, seafood, and vegetables. As a cooking technique stuffing helps retain moisture, while the mixture itself serves to augment and absorb flavors during its preparation.Poultry stuffing often consists of breadcrumbs, onion, celery, spices, and herbs such as sage, combined with the giblets. Additions in the United Kingdom include dried fruits and nuts (such as apricots and flaked almonds), and chestnuts.
  • Thanksgiving – Sub-national entitiesNovember 4, 2021 (Liberia);November 24, 2021 (Norfolk Island);November 3, 2022 (Liberia);November 30, 2022 (Norfolk Island);Thanksgiving is a national holiday celebrated on various dates in the United States, Canada, Grenada, Saint Lucia, and Liberia. It began as a day of giving thanks and sacrifice for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. Similarly named festival holidays occur in Germany and Japan. Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States and around the same part of the year in other places. Although Thanksgiving has historical roots in religious and cultural traditions, it has long been celebrated as a secular holiday as well.
  • Thanksgiving Side Dishes
  • Dutch Oven – Dutch Oven (1879–1894) was a British Thoroughbred mare that won the 1882 St. Leger Stakes. Raced extensively as a two-year-old, she won nine races and £9429, but her form faltered in her late three and four-year-old seasons. Retired in 1884, Dutch Oven was not considered to be a success in the stud, but her offspring exported to Australia and Argentina did produce successful racehorses.
  • American – American(s) may refer to:
  • Pork – Pork is the culinary name for the meat of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.Pork is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork.Pork is the most popular meat in the Western world and in Central Europe. It is also very popular in East and Southeast Asia (Mainland Southeast Asia, Philippines, Singapore, East Timor, and Malaysia). It is highly prized in Asian cuisines, especially in China, for its fat content and texture.Some religions and cultures prohibit pork consumption, notably Islam and Judaism.
  • Fruit – In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world’s agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

Read more exciting recipes!

Looking for some cooking inspiration?

Why not subscribe to our monthly recipe list? From seasonal recipes to new cooking trends that are worth trying, you will get it all and more right to your inbox. You can either follow the recipes exactly or use them as inspiration to create your own dishes. And the best part? It’s free!

recipe