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Recipe for Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 1 hr 10 min to make this recipe. The Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast recipe should make enough food for 12 slices.

You can add your own personal twist to this Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast recipe.

Ingredients for Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast

  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 Gala apples, peeled, cored and chopped
  • 1 pear, peeled, cored and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped walnuts
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 dozen large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 6 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 day-old (or slightly older) loaf challah bread, cut into 1-inch-thick slices
  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, for cooking
  • Pure maple syrup, warmed, for serving

Directions for Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast

  1. For the fruit-nut mixture: Mix the butter with the apples, pears, walnuts and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Refrigerate to chill briefly.
  2. For the French toast: Meanwhile, in a large flat dish, whisk together the eggs, milk, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt and vanilla.
  3. Make a deep slice from the side into the center of each bread slice to form a pocket. Stuff a couple spoonfuls of the fruit-nut mixture into each piece (reserve any leftover fruit-nut mixture for serving). Dip the stuffed bread in the egg mixture to moisten on both sides (but not so much that the bread falls apart).
  4. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and melt 1 tablespoon of butter. In batches, add the stuffed bread and cook until golden brown, flipping gently, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Continue cooking the remaining bread, adding additional butter as needed.
  5. Put the extra fruit-nut mixture in the skillet and cook a few minutes over medium heat, just to soften the fruit. Spoon over the French toast and serve with warm maple syrup.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Apple, Pear and Walnut Stuffed French Toast recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • French Toast Recipes
  • Nut Recipes
  • Apple Recipes
  • Fruit – In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world’s agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Pear Recipes
  • Main Dish
  • Brunch – Brunch is a combination of breakfast and lunch and regularly has some form of alcoholic drink (most usually champagne or a cocktail) served with it. It is usually served between 9am and 1pm. The word is a portmanteau of breakfast and lunch. Brunch originated in England in the late 19th century and became popular in the United States in the 1930s.
  • Breakfast – Breakfast is the first meal of the day eaten after waking from the night’s sleep, in the morning. The word in English refers to breaking the fasting period of the previous night. There is a strong likelihood for one or more “typical”, or “traditional”, breakfast menus to exist in most places, but their composition varies widely from place to place, and has varied over time, so that globally a very wide range of preparations and ingredients are now associated with breakfast.
  • Vegetarian – Vegetarianism is the practice of abstaining from the consumption of meat (red meat, poultry, seafood, and the flesh of any other animal), and it may also include abstention from by-products of animal slaughter.Vegetarianism may be adopted for various reasons. Many people object to eating meat out of respect for sentient life. Such ethical motivations have been codified under various religious beliefs, as well as animal rights advocacy. Other motivations for vegetarianism are health-related, political, environmental, cultural, aesthetic, economic, or personal preference. There are variations of the diet as well: an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet includes both eggs and dairy products, an ovo-vegetarian diet includes eggs but not dairy products, and a lacto-vegetarian diet includes dairy products but not eggs. A vegan diet excludes all animal products, including eggs and dairy. Avoidance of animal products may require dietary supplements to prevent deficiencies such as vitamin B12 deficiency, which leads to pernicious anemia. Psychologically, preference for vegetarian foods can be affected by one’s own socio-economic status and evolutionary factors.Packaged and processed foods, such as cakes, cookies, candies, chocolate, yogurt, and marshmallows, often contain unfamiliar animal ingredients, and so may be a special concern for vegetarians due to the likelihood of such additives. Feelings among vegetarians vary concerning these ingredients. Some vegetarians scrutinize product labels for animal-derived ingredients, such as cheese made with rennet, while other vegetarians do not object to consuming them or are unaware of their presence.Semi-vegetarian diets consist largely of vegetarian foods but may include fish or poultry, or sometimes other meats, on an infrequent basis. Those with diets containing fish or poultry may define meat only as mammalian flesh and may identify with vegetarianism. A pescetarian diet has been described as “fish but no other meat”.
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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