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Recipe for Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 1 hr 30 min to make this recipe. The Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets recipe should make enough food for 4 servings, butter 8 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets recipe.

Ingredients for Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets

  • 8 ounces (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons coarse grey sea salt
  • 6 ounces Roquefort or Stilton cheese, cut into chunks
  • 4 to 6 ounces beef fillets, good quality and at least 2-inches high
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Directions for Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets

  1. In a food processor, pulse butter until whipped, and add salt and cheese. Pulse again just until incorporated. Dollop the compound butter towards 1 side of a piece of natural parchment paper or plastic wrap. Roll into a log, twisting opposite ways on both ends to create a tightly wrapped log of butter. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour to set. (Can be stored up to 1 week in the refrigerator and up to 1 month in the freezer.) This could be made into 2 logs, as you will only need half this recipe for the steaks.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  3. Once butter log is set, slice 1/2 the whole log into 1/4-inch disks. Cut a slit in the side of each fillet, and stuff with a butter disk. Tie each fillet with kitchen twine to keep it shape and sprinkle pepper each side.
  4. Add the olive oil to a large oven-proof skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, sear each fillet until brown on both sides, about 3 to 5 minutes per side. Move skillet into the preheated oven to cook to desired doneness. Put another disk of the compound butter on top of each fillet just about 3 minutes before removing from oven, to just begin to melt but not melted completely. Remove from the oven and place on serving plates. Eat and enjoy!

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Fillets recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Easy Main Dish
  • Main Dish
  • Easy Lunch Recipes
  • Lunch – Lunch is a meal eaten around midday. During the 20th century, the meaning gradually narrowed to a meal eaten midday. Lunch is commonly the second meal of the day, after breakfast. The meal varies in size depending on the culture, and significant variations exist in different areas of the world.
  • Easy Baking
  • Blue Cheese – Blue cheese or bleu cheese is cheese made with cultures of the mold Penicillium, giving it spots or veins of the mold throughout the cheese, which can vary in color through various shades of blue and green. This carries a distinct smell, either from that or various specially cultivated bacteria. Some blue cheeses are injected with spores before the curds form, and others have spores mixed in with the curds after they form. Blue cheeses are typically aged in a temperature-controlled environment such as a cave. Blue cheese can be eaten by itself or can be spread, crumbled or melted into or over a range of other foods.The characteristic flavor of blue cheeses tends to be sharp and salty. Their distinct smell comes from both the mold and types of bacteria encouraged to grow on the cheese: for example, the bacterium Brevibacterium linens is responsible for the smell of many blue cheeses, as well as foot odor and other human body odors.
  • Beef – Beef is the culinary name for meat from cattle.In prehistoric times, humans hunted aurochs and later domesticated them. Since then, numerous breeds of cattle have been bred specifically for the quality or quantity of their meat. Today, beef is the third most widely consumed meat in the world, after pork and poultry. As of 2018, the United States, Brazil, and China were the largest producers of beef.Beef can be prepared in various ways; cuts are often used for steak, which can be cooked to varying degrees of doneness, while trimmings are often ground or minced, as found in most hamburgers. Beef contains protein, iron, and vitamin B12. Along with other kinds of red meat, high consumption is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer and coronary heart disease, especially when processed. Beef has a high environmental impact, being a primary driver of deforestation with the highest greenhouse gas emissions of any agricultural product.
  • Gluten Free – A gluten-free diet (GFD) is a nutritional plan that strictly excludes gluten, which is a mixture of proteins found in wheat (and all of its species and hybrids, such as spelt, kamut, and triticale), as well as barley, rye, and oats. The inclusion of oats in a gluten-free diet remains controversial, and may depend on the oat cultivar and the frequent cross-contamination with other gluten-containing cereals.Gluten may cause both gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms for those with gluten-related disorders, including coeliac disease (CD), non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), gluten ataxia, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and wheat allergy. In these people, the gluten-free diet is demonstrated as an effective treatment, but several studies show that about 79% of the people with coeliac disease have an incomplete recovery of the small bowel, despite a strict gluten-free diet. This is mainly caused by inadvertent ingestion of gluten. People with a poor understanding of a gluten-free diet often believe that they are strictly following the diet, but are making regular errors.In addition, a gluten-free diet may, in at least some cases, improve gastrointestinal or systemic symptoms in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, or HIV enteropathy, among others. There is no good evidence that gluten-free diets are an alternative medical treatment for people with autism.Gluten proteins have low nutritional and biological value and the grains that contain gluten are not essential in the human diet. However, an unbalanced selection of food and an incorrect choice of gluten-free replacement products may lead to nutritional deficiencies. Replacing flour from wheat or other gluten-containing cereals with gluten-free flours in commercial products may lead to a lower intake of important nutrients, such as iron and B vitamins. Some gluten-free commercial replacement products are not enriched or fortified as their gluten-containing counterparts, and often have greater lipid/carbohydrate content. Children especially often over-consume these products, such as snacks and biscuits. Nutritional complications can be prevented by a correct dietary education.A gluten-free diet may be based on gluten-free foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, milk and dairy products, legumes, nuts, fruits, vegetables, potatoes, rice, and corn. Gluten-free processed foods may be used. Pseudocereals (quinoa, amaranth, and buckwheat) and some minor cereals are alternative choices.
  • Low-Carb – Low-carbohydrate diets restrict carbohydrate consumption relative to the average diet. Foods high in carbohydrates (e.g., sugar, bread, pasta) are limited, and replaced with foods containing a higher percentage of fat and protein (e.g., meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds), as well as low carbohydrate foods (e.g. spinach, kale, chard, collards, and other fibrous vegetables).There is a lack of standardization of how much carbohydrate low-carbohydrate diets must have, and this has complicated research. One definition, from the American Academy of Family Physicians, specifies low-carbohydrate diets as having less than 20% carbohydrate content.There is no good evidence that low-carbohydrate dieting confers any particular health benefits apart from weight loss, where low-carbohydrate diets achieve outcomes similar to other diets, as weight loss is mainly determined by calorie restriction and adherence.An extreme form of low-carbohydrate diet called the ketogenic diet was first established as a medical diet for treating epilepsy. It became a popular fad diet for weight loss through celebrity endorsement, but there is no evidence of any distinctive benefit for this purpose and the diet carries a risk of adverse effects, with the British Dietetic Association naming it one of the “top five worst celeb diets to avoid” in 2018.
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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