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Recipe for 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 20 min to make this recipe. The 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage recipe should make enough food for 4 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential bakeware items that might be necessary for this 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage recipe.

Ingredients for 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • One 12.84-ounce box frozen mini potato-cheese pierogies
  • 1/2 pound sweet Italian sausage (about 3 links)
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed and roughly chopped
  • Pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1 pound frozen broccoli spears, thawed (split any spears that are very large)
  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan, plus more for serving

Directions for 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage

  1. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Arrange the pierogies snugly flat-side down in the skillet (there may be some overlapping). Cook until the bottoms just begin to brown, about 3 minutes. Pour in 1/2 cup of water and simmer until the pierogi dough is tender and the water has completely evaporated, 4 to 5 minutes. Lower the heat to medium and continue cooking until the bottoms are golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes more; watch carefully as they can go from golden to burnt quickly. Remove from the heat.
  2. While the pierogies cook, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When the oil is shimmering, squeeze the sausage out of the casings into the skillet. Cook the sausage, stirring frequently and breaking it up into bite-size pieces, until browned, 5 to 6 minutes. Add the garlic and pepper flakes and stir until the garlic begins to brown, about 30 seconds. Stir in the broccoli. Stir in the broth, scraping the bottom of the pan to release any browned bits. Sprinkle with the Parmesan. Reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, until the liquid is reduced by half and the broccoli is tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  3. Transfer the pierogies to a large, shallow serving dish and top with the sausage and broccoli mixture. Toss everything to combine and sprinkle with extra Parmesan.

Bakeware for your recipe

You will find below are bakeware items that could be needed for this 20-Minute Crispy Pierogies with Broccoli and Sausage recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Pierogi – Pierogi are filled dumplings made by wrapping unleavened dough around a savoury or sweet filling and cooking in boiling water. They are often pan-fried before serving.Pierogi are most often associated with the cuisine of Central and Eastern European nations. Pierogi are also popular in modern-day American and Canadian cuisine, where they are sometimes known under different local names.Typical fillings include potato, cheese, quark, sauerkraut, ground meat, mushrooms, or fruits. Savoury pierogi are often served with a topping of sour cream, fried onions, or both.
  • Broccoli – Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) is an edible green plant in the cabbage family (family Brassicaceae, genus Brassica) whose large flowering head, stalk and small associated leaves are eaten as a vegetable. Broccoli is classified in the Italica cultivar group of the species Brassica oleracea. Broccoli has large flower heads, usually dark green, arranged in a tree-like structure branching out from a thick stalk which is usually light green. The mass of flower heads is surrounded by leaves. Broccoli resembles cauliflower, which is a different, but closely related cultivar group of the same Brassica species.It is eaten either raw or cooked. Broccoli is a particularly rich source of vitamin C and vitamin K. Contents of its characteristic sulfur-containing glucosinolate compounds, isothiocyanates and sulforaphane, are diminished by boiling, but are better preserved by steaming, microwaving or stir-frying.Rapini, sometimes called “broccoli rabe,” is a distinct species from broccoli, forming similar but smaller heads and is actually a type of turnip (Brassica rapa).
  • Sausage Recipes
  • Main Dish
  • Gluten Free – A gluten-free diet (GFD) is a nutritional plan that strictly excludes gluten, which is a mixture of proteins found in wheat (and all of its species and hybrids, such as spelt, kamut, and triticale), as well as barley, rye, and oats. The inclusion of oats in a gluten-free diet remains controversial, and may depend on the oat cultivar and the frequent cross-contamination with other gluten-containing cereals.Gluten may cause both gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms for those with gluten-related disorders, including coeliac disease (CD), non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), gluten ataxia, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and wheat allergy. In these people, the gluten-free diet is demonstrated as an effective treatment, but several studies show that about 79% of the people with coeliac disease have an incomplete recovery of the small bowel, despite a strict gluten-free diet. This is mainly caused by inadvertent ingestion of gluten. People with a poor understanding of a gluten-free diet often believe that they are strictly following the diet, but are making regular errors.In addition, a gluten-free diet may, in at least some cases, improve gastrointestinal or systemic symptoms in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, or HIV enteropathy, among others. There is no good evidence that gluten-free diets are an alternative medical treatment for people with autism.Gluten proteins have low nutritional and biological value and the grains that contain gluten are not essential in the human diet. However, an unbalanced selection of food and an incorrect choice of gluten-free replacement products may lead to nutritional deficiencies. Replacing flour from wheat or other gluten-containing cereals with gluten-free flours in commercial products may lead to a lower intake of important nutrients, such as iron and B vitamins. Some gluten-free commercial replacement products are not enriched or fortified as their gluten-containing counterparts, and often have greater lipid/carbohydrate content. Children especially often over-consume these products, such as snacks and biscuits. Nutritional complications can be prevented by a correct dietary education.A gluten-free diet may be based on gluten-free foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, milk and dairy products, legumes, nuts, fruits, vegetables, potatoes, rice, and corn. Gluten-free processed foods may be used. Pseudocereals (quinoa, amaranth, and buckwheat) and some minor cereals are alternative choices.
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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