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Recipe for Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper. This dish qualifies as a Intermediate level recipe. It should take you about 2 hr 8 min to make this recipe. The Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper recipe should make enough food for 4 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper recipe.

Ingredients for Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper

  • 1/2 pound dried ancho chiles
  • 2 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 3 pound center cut pork loin
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 poblano peppers
  • Olive oil
  • 1/2 pound dried black-eyed peas
  • 2 plum tomatoes
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 1 ear fresh corn
  • 4 ounces Lime Vinaigrette
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons smoky paprika

Directions for Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper

  1. Pork:
  2. Place the anchos in a large saucepan and cover with water. Place the pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer the peppers for 15 minutes, or until soft to the touch. Drain, run under cold water, and drain again. When cool enough to handle, pull the peppers open and remove all of the seeds. Place the flesh in the bowl of a food processor. Add the honey, garlic, and salt. With the processor running, add the oil in a slow stream. Process until the mixture forms a paste. Set aside. Sprinkle the pork with salt and pepper and set aside. Spray a large saute pan with cooking spray and place over high heat for 1 minute. Place the pork in the hot pan and sear for 1 minute on all sides. Remove from pan and let cool for 10 minutes. When cool, coat the pork liberally with the ancho paste. Refrigerate for 1 hour.
  3. Fire up your grill on high and grill the pork until the internal temperature is 120 degrees F, about 7 to 10 minutes per side. Use a instant-read meat thermometer for this – they’re virtually foolproof. Remove the pork from the grill and wrap it in foil for 10 minutes.
  4. Black-Eyed Pea Salad:
  5. Place the poblanos over an open flame (one of your stove burners will do) and roast them until charred black on all sides. Place them in a paper bag and close it tightly. Set the bag aside until the peppers are cool enough to handle. Next, remove them from the bag and peel the skin off and discard – it’ll come off very easily. Rinse peppers under cool water, cut in half, and remove the seeds. Drizzle each half with a little olive oil and set aside.
  6. If you’re more organized than me you can soak the peas overnight. Drain them the next day, place them in a saucepan, cover them with water, and add a little salt to the water. Place the pan over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and let the peas simmer for 30 to 45 minutes, adding water as needed, until tender. Remove from the heat, drain, and set aside.
  7. Meanwhile, cut the tomatoes, pepper, and onion into large dice and set in a large mixing bowl. Cut the corn off the cob and add to the bowl. Add the peas, lime vinaigrette, and cilantro, and toss. Add salt and pepper, to taste. Mound the salad onto the center of 4 dinner plates. Place 1/2 a poblano on top of each of the salads. Next, uncover the pork and slice into 1/2-inch slices. Divide among the plates, placing the pork on top of the poblanos. Quickly whisk the sour cream and paprika together and top the pork with a dollop. Serve the rest on the side. Serve immediately.
  8. Lime Vinaigrette:
  9. 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
  10. 1 teaspoon Cilantro Pesto
  11. 1/2 cup olive oil
  12. Salt and pepper
  13. Pour the lime juice into the cleaned bowl of the processor. Add the Cilantro Pesto and, with the processor running, add the oil in a slow stream. Process until the vinaigrette emulsifies. Add salt and pepper, to taste, and pulse. Set aside.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Ancho-Grilled Pork Loin Capped with Smoky Paprika Cream, Served over a Zesty Black-Eyed Pea Salad and Fire-Roasted Poblano Pepper recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Pork Roast
  • Pork – Pork is the culinary name for the meat of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.Pork is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork.Pork is the most popular meat in the Western world and in Central Europe. It is also very popular in East and Southeast Asia (Mainland Southeast Asia, Philippines, Singapore, East Timor, and Malaysia). It is highly prized in Asian cuisines, especially in China, for its fat content and texture.Some religions and cultures prohibit pork consumption, notably Islam and Judaism.
  • Roast Recipes
  • Pesto Recipes
  • Salad Recipes
  • Beans and Legumes
  • Black-Eyed Pea
  • Pork Loin – Pork loin is a cut of meat from a pig, created from the tissue along the dorsal side of the rib cage.
  • Main Dish
  • Grilling – Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above, below or from the side. Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), using a cast iron/frying pan, or a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill).Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is called broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is through thermal radiation.Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma and flavor from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens.Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds. Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oils, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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