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Recipe for Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. It should take you about 1 hr 15 min to make this recipe. The Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two recipe should make enough food for 2 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two recipe.

Ingredients for Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two

  • 2 boneless pork chops (1 pound total)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 onion, diced
  • 1/2 cup chopped green apple, such as Granny Smith
  • 1/2 cup diced carrots
  • 1/2 cup diced celery
  • 1 cup crumbled cornbread
  • 1/4 cup chicken broth or stock
  • 4 sage leaves, coarsely chopped
  • Salt and ground black pepper

Directions for Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two

  1. Slice into the pork chops horizontally, but not all the way through. (You’re essentially butterflying the pork chops and giving them a little pouch.) Set aside.
  2. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat up 1 tablespoon olive oil. Add the garlic and onion and saute until fragrant and softened, about 3 minutes. Add the apple, carrots and celery and cook until softened, 7 to 10 minutes.
  3. Add in the cornbread, chicken broth and sage leaves, and stir to incorporate. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove the skillet from the heat and let the filling cool for 10 minutes.
  4. Carefully spoon the filling into the pork chops. If they become full and you can no longer stuff anymore, that’s ok-save the filling to eat on the side. Use toothpicks to secure the chops shut. If the toothpicks poke out, use scissors to trim them flush to the pork chops.
  5. In the same skillet you used earlier, heat up the remaining tablespoon olive oil. Sear the pork chops, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Turn the heat down to medium and continue cooking, flipping occasionally, until the pork chops have cooked through completely, 15 to 20 minutes. Serve warm with the additional cornbread stuffing!

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Apple Sage Cornbread-Stuffed Pork Chops for Two recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Cornbread – Cornbread is a quick bread made with cornmeal, associated with the cuisine of the Southern United States, with origins in Native American cuisine. Dumplings and pancakes made with finely ground cornmeal were staple foods of the Hopi people in Arizona. The Hidatsa people of the Upper Midwest called baked cornbread naktsi. Cherokee and Seneca tribes enriched the basic batter, adding chestnuts, sunflower seeds, apples or berries, and sometimes combining beans or potatoes with the cornmeal. Modern versions of cornbread are usually leavened by baking powder.
  • Pork Chop – A pork chop, like other meat chops, is a loin cut taken perpendicular to the spine of the pig and is usually a rib or part of a vertebra. Pork chops are unprocessed and leaner than other cuts. Chops are commonly served as an individual portion, and can be accompanied with applesauce, vegetables, and other sides. Pork is one of the most commonly consumed meats in the world. In the United States, pork chops are the most commonly consumed meat cut from the pork loin and account for 10% of total pork consumption. It comes from the pork shoulder.
  • Apple Recipes
  • Fruit – In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world’s agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Pork – Pork is the culinary name for the meat of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.Pork is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork.Pork is the most popular meat in the Western world and in Central Europe. It is also very popular in East and Southeast Asia (Mainland Southeast Asia, Philippines, Singapore, East Timor, and Malaysia). It is highly prized in Asian cuisines, especially in China, for its fat content and texture.Some religions and cultures prohibit pork consumption, notably Islam and Judaism.
  • Main Dish
  • Recipes for Two
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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