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Recipe for 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes. It should take you about 4 hr 20 min to make this recipe. The 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes recipe should make enough food for 4 to 6 servings.

You can add your own personal twist to this 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes recipe.

Ingredients for 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes

  • One 5- to 6-pound boneless chuck or rump roast
  • Fleur de sel
  • 1/2 tablespoon coarsely ground black peppercorns
  • 1/2 tablespoon coarsely ground white peppercorns
  • 1/2 tablespoon coarsely ground green peppercorns
  • 1/2 tablespoon coarsely ground coriander
  • 1/2 tablespoon coarsely ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon coarsely ground Szechwan peppercorns
  • 1/2 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tablespoon chile flakes
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • Canola oil, to cook
  • 2 sliced onions
  • 6 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 5 thin slices ginger
  • 2 cups whole Roma tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon sambal
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 cups dry red wine
  • 2 zucchinis, roll cut
  • 2 bell peppers, large dice
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and roll cut
  • 1 pound button mushrooms, quartered
  • Salt and black pepper
  • Garlic Fingerling Potatoes, recipe follows
  • East-West Mustard, recipe follows
  • 2 pounds fingerling potatoes, washed and scrubbed, skin on
  • 1/4 cup chopped garlic
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped chervil
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon mustard powder
  • 1 tablespoon wasabi powder
  • 1/2 tablespoon sugar
  • 4 tablespoons Dijon mustard

Directions for 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes

  1. Season the roast well with salt. Mix all of the spices and roll the roast well in the spices. Then roll the roast in the flour. Heat a Dutch oven or small stock pot to high. Coat with oil and sear all sides of the roast until very brown. Lower the heat and add the onions, garlic, ginger, tomatoes, sambal, sugar and wine. Check for seasoning. Cover tightly and let simmer for 3 to 3 1/2 hours. Turn the roast at least every hour. In a large bowl, mix together the zucchinis, peppers, carrots, mushrooms and season with salt and pepper. During the last hour of roasting, top the roast with the vegetables and cover. Roast is ready when it is fork tender. Remove roast and check the vegetables/sauce for seasoning.
  2. Plating: On a very large platter, place a large mound of vegetables/sauce in the middle. Surround with Garlic Fingerling Potatoes and place roast on top. Serve with side of East-West Mustard. Slice roast tableside.
  3. Preheat a hotel pan or heavy metal baking dish in a 375 oven. Toss the potatoes, garlic, olive oil, and chervil with salt and pepper. When the pan is hot, add the potatoes. They should sizzle. Roast until they turn brown, then turn oven down to 350 degrees. Cook for about 30 minutes or until a knife easily pierces the spuds.
  4. Mix the 2 powders together and add enough water to make a paste. Mix in the sugar and Dijon. Serve in a small side dish.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this 8 Spiced Pot Roast with Roasted Vegetables and Garlic Fingerling Potatoes recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Roasted Vegetable
  • Roasting – Roasting is a cooking method that uses dry heat where hot air covers the food, cooking it evenly on all sides with temperatures of at least 150 °C (300 °F) from an open flame, oven, or other heat source. Roasting can enhance the flavor through caramelization and Maillard browning on the surface of the food. Roasting uses indirect, diffused heat (as in an oven), and is suitable for slower cooking of meat in a larger, whole piece. Meats and most root and bulb vegetables can be roasted. Any piece of meat, especially red meat, that has been cooked in this fashion is called a roast. Meats and vegetables prepared in this way are described as “roasted”, e.g., roasted chicken or roasted squash.
  • Roasted Potato
  • Potato – The potato is a starchy tuber of the plant Solanum tuberosum and is a root vegetable native to the Americas, with the plant itself being a perennial in the nightshade family Solanaceae.Wild potato species, originating in modern-day Peru, can be found throughout the Americas, from Canada to southern Chile. The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated by Native Americans independently in multiple locations, but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species traced a single origin for potatoes, in the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia. Potatoes were domesticated approximately 7,000–10,000 years ago there, from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex. In the Andes region of South America, where the species is indigenous, some close relatives of the potato are cultivated.Potatoes were introduced to Europe from the Americas in the second half of the 16th century by the Spanish. Today they are a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world’s food supply. As of 2014, potatoes were the world’s fourth-largest food crop after maize (corn), wheat, and rice. Following millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 5,000 different types of potatoes. Over 99% of presently cultivated potatoes worldwide descended from varieties that originated in the lowlands of south-central Chile. The importance of the potato as a food source and culinary ingredient varies by region and is still changing. It remains an essential crop in Europe, especially Northern and Eastern Europe, where per capita production is still the highest in the world, while the most rapid expansion in production over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia, with China and India leading the world in overall production as of 2018.Like the tomato, the potato is a nightshade in the genus Solanum, and the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine which is dangerous for human consumption. Normal potato tubers that have been grown and stored properly produce glycoalkaloids in amounts small enough to be negligible to human health, but if green sections of the plant (namely sprouts and skins) are exposed to light, the tuber can accumulate a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health.
  • Roasted Tomato
  • Tomato – Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) H. Karst.Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.The tomato is the edible berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum, commonly known as a tomato plant. The species originated in western South America and Central America. The Nahuatl word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word tomate, from which the English word tomato derived. Its domestication and use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of Mexico. The Aztecs used tomatoes in their cooking at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, and after the Spanish encountered the tomato for the first time after their contact with the Aztecs, they brought the plant to Europe. From there, the tomato was introduced to other parts of the European-colonized world during the 16th century.Tomatoes are a significant source of umami flavor.The tomato is consumed in diverse ways, raw or cooked, in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks. While tomatoes are fruits—botanically classified as berries—they are commonly used as a vegetable ingredient or side dish.Numerous varieties of the tomato plant are widely grown in temperate climates across the world, with greenhouses allowing for the production of tomatoes throughout all seasons of the year. Tomato plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height. They are vines that have a weak stem that sprawls and typically needs support. Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. (Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once.) The size of the tomato varies according to the cultivar, with a range of 1–10 cm (1⁄2–4 in) in width.
  • Dutch Oven – Dutch Oven (1879–1894) was a British Thoroughbred mare that won the 1882 St. Leger Stakes. Raced extensively as a two-year-old, she won nine races and £9429, but her form faltered in her late three and four-year-old seasons. Retired in 1884, Dutch Oven was not considered to be a success in the stud, but her offspring exported to Australia and Argentina did produce successful racehorses.
  • Pot Roast
  • Roast Recipes
  • Mushroom – A mushroom or toadstool is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground, on soil, or on its food source.The standard for the name “mushroom” is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word “mushroom” is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap. “Mushroom” also describes a variety of other gilled fungi, with or without stems, therefore the term is used to describe the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota. These gills produce microscopic spores that help the fungus spread across the ground or its occupant surface.Forms deviating from the standard morphology usually have more specific names, such as “bolete”, “puffball”, “stinkhorn”, and “morel”, and gilled mushrooms themselves are often called “agarics” in reference to their similarity to Agaricus or their order Agaricales. By extension, the term “mushroom” can also refer to either the entire fungus when in culture, the thallus (called a mycelium) of species forming the fruiting bodies called mushrooms, or the species itself.
Chef Dawn
Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

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Picture of Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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