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Recipe for Apple Cider Glazed “Double Cut” Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens by Dawn’s Recipes

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Recipe for Apple Cider Glazed "Double Cut" Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens by Dawn's Recipes

We’ve outlined all the ingredients and directions for you to make the perfect Apple Cider Glazed “Double Cut” Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens. This dish qualifies as a Easy level recipe. The Apple Cider Glazed “Double Cut” Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens recipe should make enough food for 4.

You can add your own personal twist to this Apple Cider Glazed “Double Cut” Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens recipe, depending on your culture or family tradition. Don’t be scared to add other ingredients once you’ve gotten comfortable with the recipe! Please see below for a list of potential cookware items that might be necessary for this Apple Cider Glazed “Double Cut” Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens recipe.

Ingredients for Apple Cider Glazed “Double Cut” Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens

  • Four 14-ounce pork chops
  • 1 cup Apple Cider Glaze, recipe follows
  • 3 cups Sweet Potato Hash, recipe follows
  • 4 each rosemary sprigs
  • Marinade, recipe follows
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 ounces bourbon
  • 2 ounces Worcestershire
  • 1 handful juniper berries, crushed
  • Freshly crushed black pepper
  • Pinch of rosemary, thyme, sage, chopped
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup yellow onion, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced fine
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 cup andouille sausage, diced
  • 2 whole sweet potatoes, peeled and diced 1/4×1/4
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, finely ground
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 3 cups apple cider
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 sprig fresh sage
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions for Apple Cider Glazed “Double Cut” Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens

  1. Preheat grill to medium. Remove the chops from the Marinade and wipe off any excess Marinade. Grill chops, basting with Apple Cider Glaze until desired temperature. Medium temperature is 15 to 18 minutes. Present chops with a base of Sweet Potato Hash with pork chop placed on top and garnish with a rosemary sprig.
  2. Marinate the pork chops for 2 to 3 hours. In the meantime make hash and glaze.
  3. Saute onions and garlic in the olive oil over medium heat in saucepan until translucent. Add andouille sausage and stir well to combine. Once some of the fat begins to render from the sausage and the diced sweet potato and cook for stirring frequently for 10 minutes. Add chicken stock until evaporated then add cream and reduce until gone. Season with salt and pepper and keep warm.
  4. Caramelize the honey and brown sugar in a pan over medium heat, stirring constantly. Combine the apple cider, vinegar and garlic and add to sugar, bring to boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain into a small saucepan and add thyme, sage, and pepper and cook over medium heat for 15 minutes. Remove herbs and reserve for pork chops.

Cookware for your recipe

You will find below are cookware items that could be needed for this Apple Cider Glazed “Double Cut” Pork Chop with Sweet Potato Hash, Tomato Jam and Southern Greens recipe or similar recipes. Feel free to skip to the next item if it doesn’t apply.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
  • Measuring cups
  • Wooden Spoon

Categories in this Recipe

  • Grilled Pork Chop
  • Grilling – Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above, below or from the side. Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), using a cast iron/frying pan, or a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill).Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is called broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is through thermal radiation.Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma and flavor from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens.Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds. Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oils, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.
  • Pork Chop – A pork chop, like other meat chops, is a loin cut taken perpendicular to the spine of the pig and is usually a rib or part of a vertebra. Pork chops are unprocessed and leaner than other cuts. Chops are commonly served as an individual portion, and can be accompanied with applesauce, vegetables, and other sides. Pork is one of the most commonly consumed meats in the world. In the United States, pork chops are the most commonly consumed meat cut from the pork loin and account for 10% of total pork consumption. It comes from the pork shoulder.
  • American – American(s) may refer to:
  • Southern Recipes
  • Sweet Potato – The sweet potato or sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting (tasting similar to pumpkin), tuberous roots are used as a root vegetable. The young shoots and leaves are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is distantly related to the common potato (Solanum tuberosum), both being in the order Solanales. Although the darker sweet potatoes are often referred to as “yams” in parts of North America, the species is not closely related to true yams. Cultivars of the sweet potato have been bred to bear tubers with flesh and skin of various colors.Ipomoea batatas is native to the tropical regions of the Americas. Of the approximately 50 genera and more than 1,000 species of Convolvulaceae, I. batatas is the only crop plant of major importance—some others are used locally (e.g., I. aquatica “kangkong”), but many are poisonous. The genus Ipomoea that contains the sweet potato also includes several garden flowers called morning glories, though that term is not usually extended to Ipomoea batatas. Some cultivars of Ipomoea batatas are grown as ornamental plants under the name tuberous morning glory, used in a horticultural context.
  • Andouille Sausage
  • Sausage Recipes
  • Tomato – Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) H. Karst.Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.The tomato is the edible berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum, commonly known as a tomato plant. The species originated in western South America and Central America. The Nahuatl word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word tomate, from which the English word tomato derived. Its domestication and use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of Mexico. The Aztecs used tomatoes in their cooking at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, and after the Spanish encountered the tomato for the first time after their contact with the Aztecs, they brought the plant to Europe. From there, the tomato was introduced to other parts of the European-colonized world during the 16th century.Tomatoes are a significant source of umami flavor.The tomato is consumed in diverse ways, raw or cooked, in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks. While tomatoes are fruits—botanically classified as berries—they are commonly used as a vegetable ingredient or side dish.Numerous varieties of the tomato plant are widely grown in temperate climates across the world, with greenhouses allowing for the production of tomatoes throughout all seasons of the year. Tomato plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height. They are vines that have a weak stem that sprawls and typically needs support. Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. (Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once.) The size of the tomato varies according to the cultivar, with a range of 1–10 cm (1⁄2–4 in) in width.
  • Pork – Pork is the culinary name for the meat of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.Pork is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork.Pork is the most popular meat in the Western world and in Central Europe. It is also very popular in East and Southeast Asia (Mainland Southeast Asia, Philippines, Singapore, East Timor, and Malaysia). It is highly prized in Asian cuisines, especially in China, for its fat content and texture.Some religions and cultures prohibit pork consumption, notably Islam and Judaism.

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies.

More Recipes

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn

Chef Dawn lives and breathes food, always seeking new ingredients to whip up super simple recipes that are big on bold flavor. Being half French, she tends to treat food as a source of pleasure rather than just fuel for our bodies Read Full Chef Bio Here .

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